HY­GIENE TIPS FOR THE STYLISH YOU

Small ways for mak­ing a big im­pact.

Woman's Era - - Contents - Prachi Bhard­waj

Garima en­tered the party hall in a stylish long kurta teamed with palazzo and stilet­toes. Her silky-ironed hair fall­ing on her shoul­ders, her bright lip­stick mak­ing her face glow. All looked well till I hap­pened to come closer. My good­ness! She was stink­ing of body odour. And when she greeted me, I re­alised her front teeth were stained with her bright lip­stick. Garima must have put in so much think­ing and ex­e­cu­tion to her look for that oc­ca­sion but some silly mis­takes were mak­ing her ap­pear foul. Just then Rid­hima en­tered the hall. Though her dress was sim­ple and make-up sober look­ing, she ap­peared to be a de­cently garbed el­e­gant woman. Minutely ob­serv­ing Rid­hima’s ap­pear­ance left me think­ing about some sim­ple day-to­day tips that can help us come across as classy and stylish per­sons in the real sense.

Tak­ing care of body odour

Body odour is a prob­lem that engulfs most of us, es­pe­cially around sum­mer time. Though ad­ver­tise­ments at­tract with var­ied prod­ucts tar­get­ing the body odour, we don’t have to spend a for­tune to smell fresh through­out the day. Be­fore get­ting ready for the spe­cial oc­ca­sion, hop in the shower! Grab a de­odor­ant or an­tiper­spi­rant for long-last­ing fresh­ness. Last but not the least, do not for­get to have your dress washed or drycleaned each time you wear it. Al­though our spe­cial dresses are worn min­i­mally, the smell of per­fume or body re­mains in the dress. And when you hap­pen to wear it next time, it will show­case the stal­e­ness.

Tak­ing care of foul breath

It is as im­por­tant to lay at­ten­tion on how we smell as it is to fo­cus on how we look. Bad breath or hal­i­to­sis, is char­ac­terised by an un­pleas­ant odour of the mouth. There could be many causes of bad breath in­clud­ing food such as gar­lic, onions, spicy foods, ex­otic spices (such as curry), fish etc, to­bacco prod­ucts, poor den­tal hy­giene or health prob­lems. There are some things a per­son can do to elim­i­nate bad breath. Good oral hy­giene: Brush­ing the teeth and tongue, and floss­ing, keeps the mouth healthy and can of­ten get rid of bad breath. Chew­ing sug­ar­less gum or suck­ing on sugar-free mints may tem­po­rar­ily mask bad breath odour. For more se­ri­ous cases of bad breath, den­tists can pre­scribe a spe­cial tooth­paste and mouth­wash that can im­prove the symp­toms of bad breath.

Tak­ing care of the dry rough skin

Be­ing dressed up nicely in a crease-free dress but show­ing a creased skin spoils the whole show. Healthy skin is soft, sup­ple and mois­turised. We all know that un­healthy, dry and scaly skin can be re­plen­ished by fre­quent ap­pli­ca­tion of creams and lo­tions and drink­ing plenty of wa­ter.

Dr Chris­tine Lopez, a der­ma­tol­o­gist at the Cleve­land Clinic in Ohio, USA, sug­gests adding a few drops of a nat­u­ral oil, like min­eral, al­mond or avo­cado oil, to help heal dry, cracked skin. Next, gen­tly pat the skin dry with a towel — don't rub or re­move all of the wa­ter, and ap­ply a few drops of a nat­u­ral oil or a rich mois­tur­is­ing cream all over your body. This will help seal the mois­ture in.

Tak­ing care of the dandruff and split ends

You are wear­ing your fav black dress. Now imag­ine your slen­der shoul­ders be­ing flaked by dandruff. What is the point of putting in ef­fort in hav­ing a good hair-style if the hair is ob­vi­ously un­healthy? The fix for dandruff starts in the shower. “Look for sham­poos and con­di­tion­ers with the anti-dandruff in­gre­di­ent pyrithione zinc. Make sure to use both the sham­poo and con­di­tioner to­gether as a reg­i­men — if you swap for a reg­u­lar con­di­tioner, you’ll re­move the an­ti­dan­druff in­gre­di­ents you just de­posited with the sham­poo,” says James Cor­bett, owner of James Cor­bett Stu­dio in New York City and the di­rec­tor of Clairol Color.

Quick Tip: If you don’t have the time to shower af­ter you no­tice the flakes, Cor­bett rec­om­mends go­ing with a zigzag part or pulling your hair back to make the flakes dis­ap­pear into your part line.

Split ends is an­other com­mon prob­lem with most women.

BODY ODOUR IS A PROB­LEM THAT ENGULFS MOST OF US, ES­PE­CIALLY AROUND SUM­MER TIME. THOUGH AD­VER­TISE­MENTS AT­TRACT WITH VAR­IED PROD­UCTS TAR­GET­ING THE BODY ODOUR, WE DON’T HAVE TO SPEND A FOR­TUNE TO SMELL FRESH THROUGH­OUT THE DAY.

Ex­ces­sive wash­ing, harsh comb­ing and not tak­ing proper care of your hair are among the pri­mary causes of split ends. To com­bat this prob­lem, con­sider hav­ing a reg­u­lar hair trim (half to one inch off) every six to eight weeks to keep the ends of your hair healthy.

Quick Tip: Head mas­sage can be a great home rem­edy for split ends. Mas­sag­ing your scalp stim­u­lates blood cir­cu­la­tion and this gives shine and strength to your hair and pre­vents split ends as well. Use a mix­ture of co­conut oil, al­mond oil and olive oil in equal quan­ti­ties. To get bet­ter re­sults heat this oil mix­ture a lit­tle bit be­fore ap­ply­ing it to your scalp. An­other nat­u­ral beauty tip hair pack is a mix­ture of one egg, one ta­ble spoon of honey, and a half cup of milk. Leave it on the hair for 15-20 min­utes then wash it off.

Tak­ing care of chewed nails

Nail-bit­ing of­ten starts in child­hood, and can be an ex­tremely hard habit to break. “It is not only a gross habit, it is bad for health too be­cause you're putting your un­washed hands in your mouth,” says Dr Rochelle Torg­er­son, a der­ma­tol­o­gist at the Mayo Clinic.

Here are some sug­ges­tions on how to quit the habit:

It is said that the eas­i­est way to stop bit­ing your nails is to be­come more re­laxed, as nail­bit­ing is of­ten as­so­ci­ated with pres­sure, anx­i­ety or ner­vous­ness. A phys­i­cal re­minder is to put sticky tape on each fin­ger. Put bright coloured pol­ish on your nails. If you spend time car­ing for your nails, you’re less likely to want to bite them off.

Tak­ing care of your heels

Cracked heels can re­duce the price of your stilet­toes to zero! It is a very com­mon prob­lem and can range in sever­ity from a cos­metic is­sue to a painful prob­lem. Be­sides the itch­ing, in­flam­ma­tion and peel­ing skin, cracked heels give a very poor im­pres­sion of your per­son­al­ity. Tak­ing proper pre­cau­tions can pre­vent cracks. Here’s how: First soak your feet in soapy wa­ter and scrub your feet with a pumice stone. Wash your feet and then dry them thor­oughly Ap­ply any veg­etable oil lib­er­ally on your heels and soles. Put on a pair of clean socks and leave them on overnight while you sleep. In the morn­ing, your heels will be no­tice­ably softer. Re­peat this for a few days un­til the cracks in your heels are gone com­pletely. Quick tip: You can make a home­made scrub by mix­ing a hand­ful of ground rice with a few tea­spoons of honey and ap­ple cider vine­gar. Stir it un­til it be­comes a thick paste. If the crack­ing on your heels is ex­tremely bad, add a ta­ble­spoon of olive oil or sweet al­mond oil. Soak your feet in warm wa­ter for 10 min­utes and then gen­tly scrub them with the rice flour paste. Re­peat the process a few times a week un­til you are sat­is­fied with the re­sults.

And fi­nally, mir­ror mir­ror on the wall

Take a good look at your dress, it’s fit­ting, your hair­style and makeup – your en­tire look. It’s im­per­a­tive to see how you are step­ping out of the house. Don’t leave in a rush only to re­alise later that you for­got to wear per­fume or your teeth are stained with lip­stick or that the hem of your dress is open!

Small things can make or mar your en­tire im­age. While we do fo­cus on our style, make-up and dress­ing, petty mis­takes can spoil the whole ap­pear­ance. So let us take care to come across as a stylish per­son in the real sense.

A bach­e­lor's life is a fine break­fast, a flat lunch and a mis­er­able din­ner.

TAKE A GOOD LOOK AT YOUR DRESS, IT’S FIT­TING, YOUR HAIR­STYLE AND MAKE-UP – YOUR EN­TIRE LOOK. IT’S IM­PER­A­TIVE TO SEE HOW YOU ARE STEP­PING OUT OF THE HOUSE.

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