GIFT MEANS GIVE IN FULL

Woman's Era - - Teenache -

Gifts are given not only on im­por­tant oc­ca­sions but also on ca­sual oc­ca­sions. A friend may bring a gift when vist­ing an­other friend to his home. On such oc­ca­sions the friend and es­pe­cially the lady of the house is likely to say, “Why, Fran­cis, all this trou­ble. Your visit it­self is a gift for us.” Many say such things are mere lip ser­vice. Some­times, friends come from for­eign coun­tries where they have gone for work. It so hap­pens that the per­son for­gets to carry a gift or plans to take a gift the next time. The lady who is vis­ited is likely to say as an epi­logue to the friend’s visit, “The fel­low never seems to have thought of bring­ing a gift. I don’t want any gift, baba, but the fel­low could have put a few choco­lates at least in the hands of the chil­dren.”

In the olden days there was a custom of giv­ing gifts to holy men who taught re­li­gion and moral­ity. It was called dak­shine.

Nowa­days there is a custom of giv­ing gifts to peo­ple re­tir­ing af­ter long ser­vice in an of­fice. A gift given on such oc­ca­sions is called a me­mento. Once a friend ar­gued that the term should be spelled mo­mento. But he was told that it is me­mento and not mo­mento be­cause it refers to mem­ory of an im­por­tant oc­ca­sion. The re­tir­ing per­son also says some­thing like what the wo­man said about choco­lates. “What is the ne­ces­sity for this? The love and af­fec­tion show­ered on me by all of you it­self is the great­est me­mento for me.”

I am not sure whether the re­tir­ing of­fi­cer did en­joy so much love and co­op­er­a­tion from his col­leagues while he was in ser­vice.

Some­times boys play pranks with the so-called gifs. A boy gave a box to a young lady and said, “This is a gift for you.” When the girl opened the box ea­gerly a snake pounced out of the box. The girl was flab­ber­gasted. It took a long time for her to find out that it was a rub­ber snake! I have a feel­ing that she started hat­ing things made of rub­ber. What about her trust in boys like the chap who fooled her?

There is an adage: “Do not count the teeth of a gift horse.” The ad­vice is to ac­cept the gift grate­fully and grace­fully with­out look­ing at the mon­e­tary value. A gift is given out of love. Don’t try to place money value on it. It seems the teeth of a horse in­di­cate its rough age.

On one oc­ca­sion a very funny, rather an awk­ward sit­u­a­tion arose. A friend of mine and I were go­ing to a com­mon friend’s house for a birth­day party. Some­how my friend had not brought a present. Per­haps he wanted to give cash in a cover. Since, I had one or two thins to carry my friend of­fered to carry the gift packet (a bit large one) which was in my hand. When we reached the party house my friend handed over the gift (my gift) to the hosts. (Per­haps with­out re­al­is­ing that I had to present the gift.) Won­der what the hosts thought. They might have seen the ac­tual fact when they opened the packet?

There is now an in­no­va­tion in gift giv­ing. Peo­ple nowa­days gift you with gift vouch­ers. You can go to the shop and get any item you like. This is no doubt a fine idea. But there is one small hitch. The re­cip­i­ent may sleep over the mat­ter and for­get to go to the shop to col­lect the gift. Would it be a help­ful thing to in­di­cate the last date for col­lect­ing the gift?

A re­cent de­vel­op­ment in the gamut of gifts is that gifts have be­come some­what commercialised. Gifts are of­fered ga­lore by pro­duc­ers of goods to their buy­ers. Buy one, take one free is the peren­nial slo­gan nowa­days. An­other type of hid­den gifts is 10 per cent or 25 per cent in­crease in the quan­tity sold (for the same old price) in many cases like tooth­paste, face creams and so on.

To con­clude, I would like to men­tion that gifts need not be merely ma­te­rial things. When a per­son is an ac­com­plished in­di­vid­ual we say he is a gifted per­son. We also use the word gift in an id­iom ‘gift of the gab’. Above all, this piece of writ­ing is my gift to you, my es­teemed read­ers.

A RE­CENT DE­VEL­OP­MENT IN THE GAMUT OF GIFTS IS THAT GIFTS HAVE BE­COME SOME­WHAT COMMERCIALISED. GIFTS ARE OF­FERED GA­LORE BY PRO­DUC­ERS OF GOODS TO THEIR BUY­ERS. BUY ONE, TAKE ONE FREE IS THE PEREN­NIAL SLO­GAN NOWA­DAYS.

Laugh­ter heals the body be­cause, laugh­ter is the por­trait of life.

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