Bali & Be­yond

Bali Plus - - FEATURED -

For those of you who feel like get­ting around Bali, this is your chance to get out and see the sights. The fol­low­ing pages let you know where to go and how to get there. So if you need a break from the beach, start read­ing...

TEM­PLES - COASTAL

Tanah Lot - *I9 - South­west Bali,

Ta­banan re­gency. Built on a large rock and cut off from the main­land at high tide, this is one of Bali’s most spec­tac­u­lar sun­set sight.

Uluwatu - *I11 - South Bali on Bukit Badung.

This cliff-top tem­ple - ded­i­cated to the spir­its of the sea - has spec­tac­u­lar views and is pop­u­lar for view­ing sun­sets. Dur­ing the Galun­gan fes­ti­val, peo­ple from all over the is­land travel here to wor­ship.

Pura Jayaprana - North­west Bali.

Su­perb views of Men­jan­gan is­land. The sur­round­ing coral reefs can be seen from this tem­ple.

Pura Ram­but Siwi - *E6 - South­west Bali, (10km from Medewi),

Another cliff-top tem­ple with views of Java and on a clear day, Mt. Bromo. Steps down the cliff from the tem­ple lead to a black sand beach where one can swim.

TEM­PLES - IN­LAND

Pura Be­sakih - *N6 - Be­sakih, Karangasem re­gency

North­east Bali.

Bali’s most im­por­tant tem­ple with over 80 shrines de­voted to the var­i­ous gods and spir­its.

Pura Luhur Batukaru - *J6 - Ta­banan, South Bali.

Ded­i­cated to the god of Mt. Batukau, this tem­ple is a small haven for flower and bird lovers.

Pura Yeh Gangga - *K6 - near Mengwi,

Ta­banan.

Pura Ulun Danu Batur - *L4 - near Batur vil­lage.

The sec­ond most im­por­tant tem­ple af­ter Be­sakih, hous­ing more than 90 shrines. Worth vis­it­ing at any time of year but es­pe­cially dur­ing the Odalan Fes­ti­val (usu­ally in March but de­pend­ing on the full moon), which is ded­i­cated to the god­dess of the crater lake and said to con­trol the ir­ri­ga­tion sys­tems for the en­tire is­land.

Pura Ulun Danu Bratan - *J4 - near Bedugul. This tem­ple has sev­eral shrines which are lo­cated on both the lake’s shore and on var­i­ous small islets.

The fol­low­ing three tem­ples are be­tween Seri­b­atu and Tam­pak­sir­ing, north of Ubud.

Pura Gu­nung Kawi

Set in a ravine in Tam­pak­sir­ing, the tem­ples Candi’s are carved into the rock face. There are five Royal Tombs at the rear of the tem­ple com­plex.

Pura Tirta Gu­nung Kawi

A water tem­ple ded­i­cated to the Rice God­dess. Near the tem­ple grounds is a small spring-fed lake with sa­cred gold­fish, which are said to be the guardians of the Spirit of the spring.

Pura Tirtha Em­pul

Con­sid­ered the holi­est spring in Bali, this tem­ple is fre­quently vis­ited by Ba­li­nese seek­ing men­tal cleans­ing and phys­i­cal healing.

Brahma Vi­hara Ashrama Bud­dhist Monastery - *H3 – near Lov­ina. (com­bine with a visit to Ban­jar Tega Hot Springs). The Largest Bud­dhist monastery in Bali, set in beau­ti­ful sur­round­ings.

CAVES

Goa Ga­jah or Ele­phant Cave - *L7 – near Teges, Gian­yar re­gency.

Dat­ing from the 11th cen­tury, there are con­flict­ing opin­ions as to whether this cave was orig­i­nally a Bud­dhist or a Hindu her­itage. Al­though not very large, it boasts some in­ter­est­ing carv­ings.

Goa Lawah or Bat Cave - *N8 – Klungkung re­gency.

Fa­mous for the thou­sands of fruits bat that live here, this can be an in­ter­est­ing, if pun­gent, ex­pe­ri­ence.

Goa Karang Sari - *O10 – on Nusa Penida Is­land, South­east of Bali. This cave ex­tends over 200 me­ters into the hill­side and dur­ing the Galun­gan fes­ti­val hosts a torch­light pro­ces­sion and var­i­ous cer­e­monies.

PALACES

Puri Se­mara­pura - *M8 – Klungkung. A palace ded­i­cated to the God of Love, this palace was home to the Kings of Klungkung. Al­though only two pavil­ions and the en­trances gate re­main, the hall of jus­tice, Bale Kerta Gosa, is worth see­ing for its beau­ti­fully painted ceil­ing and carved pil­lars

WATER PALACES

Ta­man Ujung Water Palaces - *P7 _ near Am­la­pura, East Bali. Set in a beau­ti­fully land­scaped park, the ru­ins of this palaces are a tribute to the slightly ec­cen­tric de­signs of King Anak Agung Ngu­rah.

Puri Agung Kang­i­nan - *P6 – Karangasem, Am­la­pura. Built from a hotch-potch of dif­fer­ent styles, in­clud­ing Chi­nese, Euro­pean and Ja­vanese, this place is ar­chi­tec­turally fas­ci­nat­ing, a mon­u­ment to Ba­li­nese abil­ity to blend out­side in­flu­ences into their own cul­ture.

Tirtha Gangga Royal Bathing Pools - *O6 – near Am­la­pura, Karangasem re­gency. Great views of both Mt. Agung and the Lom­bok Strait. This palaces was dam­aged dur­ing the 1963 erup­tion of Mt. Agung, but the pools still func­tion and can be en­joyed for a small fee.

VIL­LAGES

Asak – near Am­la­pura, East Bali – Tra­di­tional cos­tumes, stone carv­ings and wo­ven crafts.

Bun­gaya - *O7 – near Am­la­pura, East Bali

As in Asak, this vil­lage spe­cial­izes in tra­di­tional arts and crafts.

Kram­bi­tan - *I8 – near Ta­banan Spe­cial­izes in bam­boo in­stru­ments and mu­sic.

Ne­gara - *D6 – West Bali Fa­mous for bull races.

Sawan - *K3 – near Sin­garaja, North Cen­tral Bali

A pic­turesque vil­lage where Game­lan in­stru­ments are made.

Ten­ganan

A Bali Aga vil­lage renowned as a cen­tre for weav­ing. The only places in In­done­sia where ‘ger­ings­ing’ cloth is made. (see Arts & Artist / ‘Tex­tiles’).

Trun­yan - *M4 – on the shores of Lake Batur, North­east Bali

An orig­i­nal Bali Aga vil­lage set in a fan­tas­tic land­scape.

Lake Batur - *M4 – Mt. Batur, Ban­gli re­gency.

The largest lake in Bali and home to the god­dess Danu, This lake lies within the crater of the Moun­tain.

Lake Bratan - *K4 – Mt. Catur near Bedugul.

Lo­ca­tion of the su­perb Ulun Dabu Tem­ple, this lake of­fers both su­perb scenery, and water­sports such as jet-ski­ing for the more ad­ven­tur­ous.

Lakes Buyan and Tam­blin­gan - *J4 Mt. Lesong in Bule­leng province.

Less vis­ited, these lake of­fer great walks and the chance of a lit­tle soli­tude for those wish­ing to es­cape the hus­tle and bus­tle of the tourist scene.

Rumah Po­hon Tu­lam­ben, Karangasem Photo Courtesy Of Agus Manu­aba

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