The Min­nesota state cap­i­tal has a thriv­ing ur­ban scene

Along with its “Twin City” St Paul on the op­po­site bank of the Mis­sis­sippi, Min­nesota’s state cap­i­tal has a thriv­ing ur­ban scene

Business Traveller - - CONTENTS - WORDS OLIVIA HULTGREN

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Stone Arch Bridge Be­gin your ur­ban ex­plo­ration at one of Min­neapo­lis’ most pho­tographed land­marks: Stone Arch Bridge. Sus­pended over the great Mis­sis­sippi River, this for­mer rail­way bridge was built in the 1800s and con­verted into a pedes­trian and cy­cle path in 1994. Stroll across it for the best groundlevel view of the city sky­line and the man-made St An­thony Falls. On the west side of Stone Arch lies the Mill City Mu­seum, built within the ru­ins of what was the world’s largest flour mill be­fore it was de­stroyed by a fire in 1991. The mu­seum’s de­sign­ers re­in­forced the build­ing’s charred walls with steel and added large panes of glass, cre­at­ing a beau­ti­ful con­trast of old and new. Get a han­dle on what the mill was like in op­er­a­tion in­side or head up to the ob­ser­va­tion deck for a panoramic view. mnhs.org/mill­city

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Tullibee in the North Loop Head north on West River Park­way and you’ll en­ter the North Loop, also known as the Ware­house Dis­trict, where 19th- and 20th-cen­tury in­dus­trial build­ings have been re­vamped into hip­ster restau­rants and art-cen­tric star­tups. In the heart of the North Loop, is Tullibee, a Scan­di­na­vian-in­spired restau­rant on the ground floor of Hew­ing Ho­tel. With the largest eth­ni­cally Nor­we­gian pop­u­la­tion in the US, a state for­est named af­ter Fin­land and an ac­cent of­ten mis­taken for Swedish, Min­nesota re­tains its Scan­di­na­vian in­flu­ence. Tullibee’s sim­ple, rus­tic in­te­rior and cui­sine makes it a great place to sam­ple Min­nesota’s back­woods flavours and ex­pe­ri­ence its Nordic her­itage. Plus, it’s open from 6.30am to mid­night. hew­ingho­tel.com/tullibee-restau­rant

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Foshay Tower Walk south to­wards Down­town Min­neapo­lis and turn right on Ni­col­let Av­enue, along a stretch known as Ni­col­let Mall, the un­of­fi­cial shop­ping cap­i­tal of the city. You’ll pass hang­ing flow­er­pots, lo­cals en­joy­ing up­scale food on out­door pa­tios and nu­mer­ous sky­way cross­ings (en­closed raised pedes­trian walk­ways); Min­neapo­lis is home to the largest sys­tem of en­closed sky­ways in the world. Down 8th Street, on the left, you’ll see the Foshay, a light brown 32-storey for­mer of­fice build­ing, its de­sign in­spired by the Washington Mon­u­ment in Washington DC. Now it is a W Ho­tel, but you can take the lift to the top and en­joy the ex­pan­sive view of Min­neapo­lis and St Paul from the ob­ser­va­tion deck, for an ad­mis­sion fee of US$10. wmin­neapol­ishotel.com

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Walker Art Cen­tre and Sculp­ture Gar­den Con­tinue south on Ni­col­let Av­enue and turn right near the Hy­att Re­gency, weav­ing through the in­ner city green­ery of Lor­ing Park. Cross the high­way and you’ll see the Spoon­bridge and Cherry sculp­ture, which is just as it sounds: a gi­ant spoon with a red cherry on its rim. En­ter the Min­neapo­lis Sculp­ture Gar­den, an out­door park hous­ing more than 40 works of art, in­clud­ing Hahn/Cock, a huge blue rooster, which de­buted in London’s Trafal­gar Square in 2013. Next to the gar­dens is Walker Art Cen­tre, a mag­nif­i­cent metal­lic and glass struc­ture and one of the most vis­ited mu­se­ums in the coun­try. Within its crisp sil­ver and white walls, you’ll find a vast ar­ray of con­tem­po­rary art, from sim­ple paint­ings to mov­ing im­age col­lec­tions. walk­er­art.org

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Bde Maka Ska Min­nesota li­cence plates read “10,000 Lakes”, though in real­ity the state con­tains even more. Just a ten-minute taxi ride from the Walker Art Cen­tre is Lake Cal­houn, re­cently re­named Bde Maka Ska to pre­serve Min­nesota’s Na­tive Amer­i­can cul­ture. Among pad­dle­board rentals and long lines of sail­ing boats, the lake’s eastern shore boasts a quaint board­walk. If you have time and fancy a craft beer, head down West Lake Street to Lyn­lake Brew­ery, where the Up­town folk gather amid bare-brick walls and bi­cy­cle wheels that hang from the ceil­ing. Take note when or­der­ing a drink that in the US a pint is 473ml; a UK pint is 568ml. Al­ter­na­tively, stick around Bde Maka Ska for the sun­set, and wit­ness the Min­neapo­lis sky­line re­flected in the lake’s wa­ters at twi­light. lyn­lake­brew­ery.com

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