BE­YOND GER­MANY

BAUHAUS

Business Traveller - - DESIGN -

The mod­ernist move­ment has two sur­pris­ing out­posts…

TEL AVIV

It may come as a sur­prise to learn that the Is­raeli city has the largest col­lec­tion of Bauhaus build­ings (above) in the world, the re­sult of the em­i­gra­tion of Ger­man Jewish ar­chi­tects fol­low­ing the rise of the Nazis. Now a Unesco World Her­itage site, the 4,000-plus build­ings of Tel Aviv’s White City can be taken in on a guided two-hour walk­ing tour (80 shekels/£18) from Bauhaus Centre Tel Aviv, which also has a free per­ma­nent ex­hi­bi­tion. bauhaus-cen­ter.com

CHICAGO

When Chicago’s in­dus­trial lead­ers wanted to boost the city’s pro­file, they turned to Bauhaus for in­spi­ra­tion. Hun­gar­ian émi­gré Mo­holy-Nagy, one of the move­ment’s orig­i­nal teach­ers, was drafted in and the New Bauhaus school was cre­ated in 1937. While it only lasted a year, its in­flu­ence had greater longevity. Mies van der Rohe was also drawn to the city and de­signed sev­eral build­ings on the Illi­nois In­sti­tute of Tech­nol­ogy cam­pus. Ar­chi­tec­tural high­lights down­town in­clude his Kluczyn­ski Fed­eral Build­ing, Dirk­sen Fed­eral Build­ing and AMA Plaza at 330 North Wabash; the last of these is home to the Lang­ham ho­tel.

chicagob­auhaus­be­yond.org

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