Bray People

There was a lot of tears be­fore­hand

IN THE FI­NAL PART OF THE SE­RIES WE TALK TO THE MOTH­ERS (AND FA­THERS) OF BA­BIES BORN DUR­ING THE COVID-19 PAN­DEMIC

- By MARY FOGARTY Women's Health · Blood Disorders · Health Conditions · Pregnancy · Blood Pressure

ISOBELLE FLA­HERTY, daugh­ter of Sarah Parker and Robert Fla­herty, was born on the night of April 7.

The pre­vi­ous month, the world had changed.

‘ I was ac­tu­ally at a fam­ily fu­neral when my job called me,’ said Sarah. ‘ They wanted me to work at home as I was preg­nant. That was March 12, and I didn’t go back into work af­ter that.’

Sarah said that work­ing at home for a cou­ple of weeks be­fore her ma­ter­nity leave was quite nice. ‘ I had been hav­ing a great preg­nancy with no is­sues,’ she said.

On March 30 she went to a clinic ap­point­ment and her blood pres­sure was high.

‘ I had never had is­sues be­fore with any­thing like that,’ said Sarah. ‘ In my mind I wasn’t anx­ious, but re­ally at that point I was wor­ried and anx­ious.’

Her big­gest worry was the thought of po­ten­tially hav­ing to de­liver their first child with­out her part­ner there.

Sarah was ad­mit­ted to hospi­tal due to the high blood pres­sure, and her part­ner Robert couldn’t come in to see her.

‘ They were amaz­ing in Holles Street, but I was still up­set,’ she said. She did go home af­ter a few days but un­for­tu­nately had to be ad­mit­ted again, for the same rea­son, again, with­out any­one with her.

‘ I was at a point where I just needed to get home, there were a lot of tears.’

She did get home for a day and was re­lax­ing, tak­ing naps and baths and pre­par­ing for the new ar­rival. The baby wasn’t due un­til April 21, but Sarah’s wa­ters broke two weeks early.

Off she went to Holles Street again, to the pre- labour ward. Af­ter stay­ing overnight with noth­ing hap­pen­ing, she was given oxy­tocin to bring on labour.

‘ My part­ner was ready and wait­ing out­side,’ said Sarah. He was brought into the labour ward to join Sarah, and Isobelle joined them at 10.30 p. m.

‘ Every­thing was fine, there were no is­sues. Be­cause my wa­ters had bro­ken and there was a gap of 24 hours, we had to stay in for 36 hours and she was mon­i­tored.’

Sarah de­scribed the mo­ment Robert had to leave them when she was be­ing brought back down to the pre- labour ward. ‘ We went down in one lift and he went in an­other, and he wasn’t al­lowed

back in,’ she said. ‘ That was one of the hard­est things ever. My heart was bro­ken look­ing at his face.’

She was look­ing for­ward to get­ting back to her own home, and Robert couldn’t wait to get them home.

Once safely home in Grey­stones, they were able to avail of the domino scheme. Be­cause of their prox­im­ity to the hospi­tal, the mid­wife came to the house for checks.

‘ We were in our own lit­tle bub­ble, with no­body call­ing and not see­ing any­body,’ said Sarah. ‘ Friends did come and we’d show them the baby at the door.

‘ It’s not what I ever imag­ined when we said we were hav­ing a baby. If I had been told nine months ear­lier that this was how it would hap­pen I would have said that’s like some­thing from a hor­ror movie.’

Isobelle made it none­the­less. ‘ She’s here and she’s amaz­ing and healthy,’ said Sarah, whose best friend had a baby last week so the two can share their ex­pe­ri­ences from now on.

‘ It was very hard, but Holles St were amaz­ing, the mid­wives were un­real.’ While she had fears ahead of the birth, Sarah made up her mind to be strong. ‘ I just thought, we just have to take it on the chin, and what­ever hap­pens hap­pens.’

WE WENT DOWN IN ONE LIFT AND HE WENT IN AN­OTHER, AND HE WASN’T AL­LOWED BACK IN. MY HEART WAS BRO­KEN LOOK­ING AT HIS FACE

 ??  ?? Sarah Parker with Robert Fla­herty and baby Isobelle Fla­herty.
Sarah Parker with Robert Fla­herty and baby Isobelle Fla­herty.
 ??  ?? Isobelle Fla­herty.
Isobelle Fla­herty.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Ireland