EMO­TIONAL RES­CUE FOR YOUNG READ­ERS

The Irish Times - Friday - The Ticket - - ANIMATION TAMSINLYONS -

If 2017 was the year in which fem­i­nism dom­i­nated chil­dren’s pub­lish­ing, emo­tional health has been the key theme for 2018, with fic­tion and non-fic­tion ti­tles en­cour­ag­ing young read­ers of all ages to con­sider their emo­tions. From re­silience to mind­ful­ness, books of­fer the po­ten­tial to al­low chil­dren to see their own wor­ries from a more ob­jec­tive per­spec­tive and to find in­spi­ra­tion and prob­lem-solv­ing tools in the tri­als of fic­tional char­ac­ters. Here are some of the best of these ti­tles pub­lished this year. mis­take – yum!” The naif il­lus­tra­tions make the book ac­ces­si­ble in vis­ual style too, while the di­rect chal­leng­ing of thought pat­terns works as a gen­tle in­tro­duc­tion to cog­ni­tive be­hav­iour tech­niques. All the Ways to Be Smart by Dav­ina Bell

Scribe,£11.99 This colour­ful pic­ture-book pro­vides an al­ter­na­tive per­spec­tive on the cul­ture of aca­demic achieve­ment by cel­e­brat­ing a di­ver­sity of ta­lents. In slick rhyme, Bell tells us: “Smart is not just be­ing best at spell­ing bees, a tricky test. Or know­ing all the an­swers ever . . . Other things are just as clever.” All the Ways to Be Smart in­vites chil­dren to ques­tion and take own­er­ship of their own spe­cial strengths. There is value in prac­ti­cal abil­ity, cre­ative imag­i­na­tion, so­cial skil­lan­de­mo­tion­alsen­si­tiv­ity.Ali­son Colpoys’s il­lus­tra­tions cel­e­brate a di­ver­sity of cul­tures too, of­fer­ing a pa­rade of beauty that will give chil­dren of all back­grounds and in­ter­ests con­fi­dence in their own unique­ness.

Head­bomz:Wreckin’YerHead by Oisin McGann

Free Com­mis­sioned by the ISPCC to co­in­cide with their Talk­ing Makes Us Stronger cam­paign, Head­bomz is pitched at the 9-11 age group, and in­tro­duces us to a tight-knit group of friends who are hav­ing dif­fi­cul­ties in dif­fer­ent ar­eas of their lives, from school­yard bul­ly­ing to parental con­flict, ill­ness and grief. McGann uses his en­gag­ing story to en­cour­age young read­ers to find a trusted friend, child or adult, to share their prob­lems – their “head­bomz” – with. The book is avail­able free of charge, and there are a va­ri­ety of prac­ti­cal tools avail­able for par­ents and teach­ers on head­bomz.ie

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