Young­blood lacks ‘wow’ of Wolfen­stein se­ries

Wicklow People (West Edition) - - ENTERTAINM­ENT -

VERY rarely has it been pru­dent to ac­cuse Wolfen­stein of play­ing it safe, af­ter all, it is a se­ries of games re­volv­ing around slaugh­ter­ing Nazis wholesale and in very graphic de­tail. Wolfen­stein: Young­blood is hon­estly no ex­cep­tion, but it nev­er­the­less lacks any of the real ‘wow’ mo­ments that dom­i­nate the Wolfen­stein games in the main se­ries.

Young­blood is some­thing of a spinoff, casting you as ei­ther of the twin daugh­ter’s of Wil­liam ‘BJ’ Blazkow­icz, the run­ning and gun­ning se­ries stal­wart and ven­er­a­ble gam­ing icon. By com­par­i­son, his daugh­ters are quite tame, not helped in any way by the lack­lus­ter story they have had penned for them. Al­most every­thing about Young­blood feels like a down­grade from the wacky and shock­ing events of past ti­tles. Young­blood’s story has al­most noth­ing sur­pris­ing up its sleeve and its sup­port­ing cast of hum­drum char­ac­ters do ab­so­lutely noth­ing to el­e­vate the story to some­thing re­sem­bling mem­o­rable.

Thanks to their power ar­mor suits, the sis­ters - Soph and Jess - be­gin the game with a range of abil­i­ties that their fa­ther had to work for in Wolfen­stein 2 - no­tably the dou­ble jump. There are a wealth of abil­i­ties for the sis­ters to un­lock, though very few of them ac­tu­ally feel as though they were de­signed for char­ac­ters with sym­bi­otic or com­plen­tary re­la­tion­ships, which is a shame when con­sid­er­ing that this is a game about twin sis­ters. Nev­er­the­less, the up­grade sys­tem ex­cels else­where in the gun depart­ment. The large se­lec­tion of shot­guns, pis­tols, SMGs, ri­fles and many more can all be up­graded ex­ten­sively, with the up­grades mak­ing vis­ual changes to the ac­tual gun mod­els.

Bizarrely, Young­blood fea­tures a nu­mer­i­cal lev­el­ling sys­tem for both the pro­tag­o­nists and the en­e­mies, which doesn’t re­ally add much but def­i­nitely sub­tracts a great deal of bal­ance from the game. For ex­am­ple, you may come up against some mi­nor en­e­mies that are the same level as you or higher that will give you a good run for your money. How­ever, en­e­mies that are a lower level than you are ba­si­cally can­non fod­der.

Young­blood’s much touted par­a­digm shift of al­low­ing you to com­plete mis­sions in any or­der is some­what un­der­mined by this lev­el­ling me­chanic, which es­sen­tially forces you back to­wards com­plet­ing the mis­sions in a some­what pre­de­ter­mined man­ner.

Over­all, Wolfen­stein: Young­blood is an ac­cept­able, if not some­what dis­ap­point­ing in­stal­ment to a se­ries of games that rarely war­rant any­thing less than an ex­em­plary score.

Young­blood’s story has al­most noth­ing sur­pris­ing up its sleeve and its sup­port­ing cast of hum­drum char­ac­ters do ab­so­lutely noth­ing to el­e­vate the story to some­thing re­sem­bling mem­o­rable.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Ireland

© PressReader. All rights reserved.