Ion Fury a wel­come throw­back to FPS gam­ing

Wicklow People (West Edition) - - ENTERTAINM­ENT -

EN­THU­SI­AS­TI­CALLY re­ceived by the gam­ing masses, there seems to be no real rea­son for the on­slaught of metroid­va­nia-in­spired throw­back ti­tles to slow down. Of course, there are many, many good ti­tles in that ilk ap­pear­ing but, nev­er­the­less, it is some­what of a shame that few other sub­gen­res are re­ceiv­ing the same mistyeyed nos­tal­gic treat­ment shown to the metroid­va­nia clones.

For this rea­son alone, Ion Fury de­serves heap­ings of praise. There must be very few life­long gamers born in the early 90’s who don’t have fond mem­o­ries slog­ging their way through the gra­tu­itously vi­o­lent Duke Nukem or DOOM - three di­men­sional slaugh­ter sim­u­la­tors that wowed hy­per­ac­tive chil­dren as much as they dis­tressed con­cerned par­ents.

Now, the cheesy magic of early to mid-90’s FPS gam­ing can be re­lived, as Ion Fury en­ters the vast fray of throw­back ti­tles, com­plete with its corny di­a­logue snip­pets, charm­ingly aw­ful graph­ics and a lack of hand-hold­ing that will seem ob­scene to some­one not for­tu­nate enough to be fa­mil­iar with old-timey run ‘n’ guns.

Ion Fury is not a mod­ern re­vi­tal­i­sa­tion of a genre, but more of a paint-by-num­bers homage to a num­ber of games, but most ob­vi­ously Duke Nuken. It has it all, from the eye-rolling one-lin­ers, the mix­ture of sprite and 3D an­i­ma­tion, ear-pierc­ingly loud but in­cred­i­bly sat­is­fy­ing gun sounds, all the way to hav­ing the ac­tual voice of Duke Nukem him­self - Jon St. Jon. Ion Fury is so painfully au­then­tic that it even uses the same en­gine as Duke Nukem and could eas­ily be passed off as a re­lease that is twenty five years old.

Still true to its in­spi­ra­tions, Ion Fury is ob­scenely dif­fi­cult in parts, with the boss fights prov­ing to be es­pe­cially tricky to the point where they may feel al­most im­pos­si­ble to com­plete. Luck­ily, the guns are as pow­er­ful as they are var­ied, with each weapon posess­ing an al­ter­nate fir­ing mode that is both ex­tremely use­ful and very fun.

Though tu­to­ri­als and busy HUD’s showing your next ob­jec­tive evolved in gam­ing for a rea­son, it must be said that Ion Fury’s dis­tinct lack of any prod­ding in the right di­rec­tion is ex­tremely re­fresh­ing. That be­ing said, there were parts where the painstak­ing back­track­ing and search­ing be­came more of a bur­den than a bless­ing. At least the de­vel­op­ers have pos­i­tively stuffed the lev­els with an seem­ingly end­less ar­ray of hid­den com­part­ments and tun­nels.

Clearly, Ion Fury is a la­bor of love on the de­vel­oper’s part and a wel­come throw­back to some of the most mem­o­rable and nos­tal­gic games ever con­ceived.

Ion Fury is not a mod­ern re­vi­tal­i­sa­tion of a genre, but more of a paint-by-num­bers homage to a num­ber of games, but most ob­vi­ously Duke Nuken.

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