It’s time to bask in the peace and tran­quil­lity of the new school term

Wicklow People (West Edition) - - LIFESTYLE - Jus­tine O’Ma­hony

THIS WEEK IS SORT OF A RE­TURN TO SAN­ITY. I GET TO CLEAN THE HOUSE AND FOR IT TO RE­MAIN CLEAN AT LEAST FOR A FEW HOURS

I know for def­i­nite that I’m not the only mother breath­ing a huge bloody sigh of re­lief that my off­spring are go­ing back to school this week.

I can guar­an­tee you the ma­jor­ity of mam­mies through­out the coun­try are wav­ing their kids off, shut­ting the front door be­hind them and mut­ter­ing the words ‘Thanks be to Jay­sus!’

And look, it goes without say­ing we love them. But you can love some­body and want to get rid of them for a few hours ev­ery day as well.

Ab­sence makes the heart grow fonder and all that. I know my heart will cer­tainly grow fonder now that I don’t have to sup­ply end­less amounts of snacks, drag them out of bed at mid­day, beg them to tidy their rooms and re­peat­edly ask them to get off their phones.

Our house isn’t the ti­di­est at the best of times. We’re more ‘throw it all into a cup­board and close the door’ sort of peo­ple rather than ‘let’s de­clut­ter and keep ev­ery­thing clean and min­i­mal­ist.’ But when the kids are on hol­i­days the whole place just goes to pot.

I do try……..well at the be­gin­ning of the hol­i­days I try to keep some sem­blance of de­cency about the house but by week three I just give up. I only col­lect the ran­cid plates and glasses from their bed­rooms when we run out of clean ones and the wash­ing gets done when it starts to over­flow from the bas­ket.

Be­cause I’ve dis­cov­ered that when I put clean laun­dry on their beds daily, they just mix it all in with the dirty stuff so when they even­tu­ally get around to clean­ing their bed­rooms they chuck EV­ERY­THING, clean and dirty into the wash­ing bas­ket be­cause they can’t be both­ered to sort through it.

So for me this week is sort of a re­turn to san­ity. I get to clean the house and for it to re­main clean at least for a few hours, I get a bit of peace and quiet, a cup of tea without some­one else say­ing ‘can I have one?’

Food re­mains in the fridge af­ter I do the shop­ping, at least un­til they come home from school and we will make at­tempts at nor­mal con­ver­sa­tion at the din­ner table. They might not be suc­cess­ful, there will most def­i­nitely be a se­ries of grunts and mum­bles on be­half of the teenagers but we will try.

And yes, I will prob­a­bly be giv­ing out about the school run, pack­ing lunches, lost uni­form and the end­less re­quests for money by the end of the week but for now, right at this very mo­ment in time, I am sim­ply bask­ing in the peace and tran­quil­lity that sig­ni­fies term time.

School was def­i­nitely in­vented by a mother!

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