Lo spi­ri­to del luo­go

SPI­RIT OF A PLA­CE

Abitare - - SOMMARIO - txt Ire­ne Gu­z­man pho­tos En­ri­co Co­stan­ti­ni

Spi­rit of a Pla­ce

txt ire­ne gu­z­ma­ni pho­tos en­ri­co co­stan­ti­ni

| Un pa­laz­zo nel Sa­len­to ri­vi­ve co­me spa­zio per l’ar­te gra­zie a uno sti­mo­lan­te pro­get­to di PS+A PA­LOM­BA SE­RA­FI­NI AS­SO­CIA­TI / A pa­laz­zo in the Sa­len­to re­gion has been gi­ven a new lea­se of li­fe as an art spa­ce thanks to a de­si­gn by ps+a Pa­lom­ba Se­ra­fi­ni As­so­cia­ti

ESI­STO­NO PRO­GET­TI che pos­so­no na­sce­re so­lo da una pro­fon­da em­pa­tia con i luo­ghi, da una vi­sio­ne con­sa­pe­vo­le di ciò che era­no e di ciò che è giu­sto che di­ven­ti­no. È co­sì che Lu­do­vi­ca e Ro­ber­to, ani­me del­lo stu­dio ps+a Pa­lom­ba Se­ra­fi­ni As­so­cia­ti, han­no da­to una nuo­va chia­ve di let­tu­ra a un’ari­sto­cra­ti­ca re­si­den­za ot­to­cen­te­sca si­tua­ta a Ga­glia­no del Ca­po, nel Sa­len­to, pro­prio in fon­do al tac­co del­lo Sti­va­le. Pa­laz­zo Da­nie­le è un luo­go con un’ener­gia par­ti­co­la­re, edi­fi­ca­to nell’an­no dell’Uni­tà d’Ita­lia dai bi­snon­ni dell’at­tua­le pro­prie­ta­rio – Fran­ce­sco Pe­truc­ci – il qua­le, spin­to dal­la sua pas­sio­ne per l’ar­te con­tem­po­ra­nea, ha de­sti­na­to tut­ta l’ala de­stra, cir­ca 500 me­tri qua­dra­ti, a spa­zio

THE­RE ARE PRO­JEC­TS that stem from a pro­found fee­ling for their lo­ca­tions, from a con­scious vi­sion of what they on­ce we­re and of what it is right for them to be­co­me. This is the way that Lu­do­vi­ca and Ro­ber­to, foun­ders of the prac­ti­ce ps+a (Pa­lom­ba Se­ra­fi­ni As­so­cia­ti), ha­ve co­me up wi­th a new in­ter­pre­ta­tion of a 19th-cen­tu­ry ari­sto­cra­tic re­si­den­ce lo­ca­ted at Ga­glia­no del Ca­po, in Sa­len­to, at the ve­ry tip of Ita­ly’s heel. Pa­laz­zo Da­nie­le is a pla­ce wi­th a par­ti­cu­lar ener­gy, built in the year of the coun­try’s uni­fi­ca­tion by the great grand­pa­ren­ts of the pre­sent ow­ner – Fran­ce­sco Pe­truc­ci – who, dri­ven by his pas­sion for con­tem­po­ra­ry art, has set asi­de the who­le of the right wing, around 500 squa­re me­tres, as a work

di la­vo­ro e re­si­den­za per ar­ti­sti. Non un me­ro con­te­ni­to­re ma un pro­get­to in con­ti­nua evo­lu­zio­ne do­ve ar­chi­tet­tu­ra e ar­te si fon­do­no a fa­vo­re di que­st’ul­ti­ma, la­vo­ran­do sull’au­ra sacrale dell’as­sen­za per sti­mo­la­re la crea­zio­ne di ope­re e in­stal­la­zio­ni si­te-spe­ci­fic che in mol­ti ca­si di­ven­ta­no par­te in­trin­se­ca del­la ca­sa: co­me la gran­de stan­za da ba­gno, do­ve l’ac­qua scen­de dal sof­fit­to al­to sei me­tri all’in­ter­no di un gran­de ba­ci­no di pie­tra se­re­na di­se­gna­to da An­drea Sa­la, op­pu­re le ca­me­re da let­to mo­na­ca­li il­lu­mi­na­te da un’in­stal­la­zio­ne di Si­mon d’Exéa. Spie­ga Lu­do­vi­ca Se­ra­fi­ni: «L’in­ter­ven­to di re­cu­pe­ro è vol­to a evi­den­zia­re il te­ma del di­stac­co e a ri­por­ta­re que­sti spa­zi all’idea di luo­ghi non più abi­ta­ti­vi, non più den­si, ma svuo­ta­ti e li­be­ra­ti dal­la lo­ro na­tu­ra e dal­la lo­ro fun­zio­ne». Po­chi gli ele­men­ti di ar­re­do, sia nel­le ca­me­re che ne­gli spa­zi co­mu­ni, sem­pli­cis­si­mi e qua­si tut­ti pen­sa­ti su mi­su­ra per man­te­ne­re in­tat­to il “ge­nius lo­ci”, la cui for­tis­si­ma iden­ti­tà ri­ma­ne tan­to nel ri­go­re e nel­la geo­me­tria spa­ce and re­si­den­ce for ar­tists. This is no me­re con­tai­ner but a con­ti­nual­ly evol­ving pro­ject in whi­ch ar­chi­tec­tu­re and art are fu­sed to ser­ve the needs of the lat­ter, wor­king on the sa­cred au­ra of absence to stimulate the crea­tion of si­te­spe­ci­fic works and in­stal­la­tions that in ma­ny ca­ses ha­ve be­co­me an in­trin­sic part of the hou­se. This is true of the lar­ge ba­th­room, whe­re wa­ter falls from the six-me­tre-hi­gh cei­ling in­to a great ba­sin of pie­tra se­re­na de­si­gned by An­drea Sa­la, or the mo­na­stic be­drooms il­lu­mi­na­ted by an in­stal­la­tion by Si­mon d’Exéa. As Lu­do­vi­ca Se­ra­fi­ni ex­plains: “The re­fur­bish­ment is in­ten­ded to un­der­li­ne the the­me of de­ta­ch­ment and bring the­se spa­ces back to the idea of pla­ces that are no lon­ger for li­ving, whi­ch are no lon­ger den­se, but emp­tied out and set free from their na­tu­re and their func­tion.” On­ly a few, ve­ry sim­ple pie­ces of fur­ni­tu­re, are to be found in the be­drooms as well as in the com­mon spa­ces, and al­mo­st all of them ma­de to measure in or­der to keep the ge­nius lo­ci in­tact, who­se ve­ry strong iden­ti­ty

UN PRO­GET­TO IN CON­TI­NUA EVO­LU­ZIO­NE CHE LA­VO­RA SULL’AU­RA SACRALE DELL’AS­SEN­ZA PER STI­MO­LA­RE LA CREA­ZIO­NE DI OPE­RE D’AR­TE E DI IN­STAL­LA­ZIO­NI SI­TE-SPE­CI­FIC A CON­TI­NUAL­LY EVOL­VING PRO­JECT WOR­KING ON THE SA­CRED AU­RA OF ABSENCE TO STIMULATE THE CREA­TION OF SI­TE-SPE­CI­FIC ART WORKS AND IN­STAL­LA­TIONS

PO­CHI GLI ELE­MEN­TI DI AR­RE­DO, SIA NEL­LE CA­ME­RE SIA NE­GLI SPA­ZI CO­MU­NI, SEM­PLI­CI E PEN­SA­TI PER MAN­TE­NE­RE IN­TAT­TO IL GE­NIUS LO­CI A FEW, VE­RY SIM­PLE PIE­CES OF FUR­NI­TU­RE IN THE BE­DROOMS AS WELL IN THE COM­MON SPA­CES, MA­DE TO MEASURE IN OR­DER TO KEEP THE GE­NIUS LO­CI IN­TACT

del­le fac­cia­te ori­gi­na­rie, quan­to nell’as­se cen­tra­le co­sti­tui­to dall’in­fi­la­ta dei sa­lo­ni decorati di gu­sto ot­to­cen­te­sco i qua­li, an­che gra­zie all’il­lu­mi­na­zio­ne ben ca­li­bra­ta, fan­no da cor­ni­ce al­le ope­re d’ar­te. Lo spi­ri­to del luo­go che emer­ge an­che gra­zie a una se­rie di scel­te pro­get­tua­li, dall’ado­zio­ne di una pit­tu­ra sce­no­gra­fi­ca “ru­ba­ta” al ci­ne­ma per le pa­re­ti, in gra­do di tra­smet­te­re la sen­sa­zio­ne che sia­no sem­pre esi­sti­te in quel­la me­de­si­ma po­si­zio­ne, al­la scel­ta del co­lo­re ne­ro per la pi­sci­na di uno dei due giar­di­ni ester­ni, che ri­chia­ma una vi­sio­ne not­tur­na del ma­re, di­stan­te me­no di un chi­lo­me­tro. An­che gli in­ter­ven­ti ar­chi­tet­to­ni­ci strut­tu­ra­li so­no sta­ti pen­sa­ti per sot­tra­zio­ne, co­me la ri­mo­zio­ne di una stan­za che col­le­ga­va le due ali la cui aper­tu­ra ora di­la­ta la fu­ga pro­spet­ti­ca dal­la cor­te ver­so la pic­co­la “kaf­fee­haus” nell’agru­me­to, o l’ar­co in­ter­no por­ta­to in fac­cia­ta in un con­ti­nuum spa­zio-tem­po­ra­le tra due pe­rio­di sto­ri­ci di­stan­ti. ○ has been pre­ser­ved in bo­th the ri­gour and geo­me­try of the ori­gi­nal faça­des and in the cen­tral axis for­med by the sui­te of lar­ge rooms de­co­ra­ted in 19th-cen­tu­ry ta­ste whi­ch, thanks in part to the ca­re­ful­ly ca­li­bra­ted lighting, pro­vi­de a set­ting for works of art. The spi­rit of pla­ce that emer­ges, par­tly as a re­sult of a se­ries of de­si­gn choi­ces, the adop­tion of a sce­nic set­tings “bor­ro­wed” from ci­ne­ma for the walls, is ca­pa­ble of con­vey­ing the sen­sa­tion that they ha­ve al­ways exi­sted in ju­st that po­si­tion, and the choi­ce of the co­lour black for the pool in one of the hou­se’s two gar­dens, whi­ch re­minds us of a noc­tur­nal view of the sea, that is less than a ki­lo­me­tre away. The struc­tu­ral in­ter­ven­tions ha­ve been con­cei­ved in terms of sub­trac­tion, su­ch as the re­mo­val of a room that con­nec­ted the two wings, who­se ope­ning now di­la­tes the vi­sta from the court to­ward the small “kaf­fee­haus” in the ci­trus or­chard, or the in­ter­nal ar­ch brought on­to the faça­de in a spa­tio-tem­po­ral con­ti­nuum bet­ween two re­mo­te hi­sto­ri­cal pe­riods. ○

Il pa­laz­zo no­bi­lia­re si svi­lup­pa su due ali dal cor­ti­le d’ono­re: una de­sti­na­ta a re­si­den­za pri­va­ta, l’al­tra a re­si­den­za d’ar­ti­sta (in que­ste pa­gi­ne), col­le­ga­ta all’Ac­ca­de­mia di Fran­cia con se­de a Ro­ma.The pa­la­ce de­ve­lops as two wings from the cour­tyard of ho­nour: one used as a pri­va­te re­si­den­ce the other for ar­ti­st-in-re­si­den­ce pro­gram­mes (the­se pa­ges), lin­ked to the Fren­ch Aca­de­my ba­sed in Ro­me.

Nel­le sa­le af­fre­sca­te, qua­dri di fa­mi­glia si al­ter­na­no a ope­re di ar­ti­sti con­tem­po­ra­nei – la te­la di Ale­xan­dra Ka­ra­ka­shian (so­pra) e il light­box di Si­mon d’Exéa (a la­to) – e a clas­si­ci del de­si­gn co­me gli im­bot­ti­ti Li­ri­co e il cof­fee ta­ble Car­mi­na, di­se­gna­ti da L+R per Dria­de, e la lam­pa­daFor­tu­ny di Pal­luc­co.In the fre­scoed rooms, fa­mi­ly por­trai­ts al­ter­na­te wi­th works by con­tem­po­ra­ry ar­tists – the can­vas by Ale­xan­dra Ka­ra­ka­shian (abo­ve) and the light­box by Si­mon d’Exéa (op­po­si­te) – and de­si­gn clas­sics li­ke the Li­ri­co arm­chairs and so­fa, the Car­mi­na cof­fee ta­ble, de­si­gned by L+R for Dria­de, and the For­tu­ny lamp from Pal­luc­co.

Nel­la stan­za da ba­gno (so­pra a de­stra e a la­to), pa­vi­men­to ori­gi­na­le e la­va­biTwin di Ce­ra­mi­ca Fla­mi­nia. Nel cor­ti­le in­ter­no, da­van­ti al­la pi­sci­na (pa­gi­na ac­can­to), le Aca­pul­co chairs – un clas­si­co del de­si­gn mes­si­ca­no de­gli an­ni Cin­quan­ta – e il mu­ro ne­ro, co­sì di­pin­to per con­tra­sta­re il ver­de in­ten­so dei cac­tus.In the ba­th­room (abo­ve right and right), ori­gi­nal floor and Twin sinks from Ce­ra­mi­ca Fla­mi­nia. In the in­ner cour­tyard, in front of the pool (fa­cing pa­ge), the Aca­pul­co Chairs, a 1950s Me­xi­can de­si­gn clas­sic. The wall is pain­ted black to pro­vi­de a con­tra­st wi­th the bright green of the cac­ti.

Newspapers in Italian

Newspapers from Italy

© PressReader. All rights reserved.