GLASS IT IS! L’era del­la ve­tra­ta con­ti­nua

Top Yacht Design - - Out Of The Box - Lu­ca Bas­sa­ni An­ti­va­ri - foun­der and pre­si­dent of Wal­ly

For the la­st cou­ple of de­ca­des, ya­ch­ts ha­ve been ope­ning up to the sea thanks to mu­ch tou­gher glass that is al­so ea­sier to sha­pe in­to cur­ves and other forms. This has re­sul­ted in the old Noah’s Ark ap­proa­ch of " # # 8 ( ( " 8 # # "" < # ( " # ( ) = #

"# # 5 " ( de­si­gned. This po­ses no sa­fe­ty pro­blems. On the ae­sthe­tic

% # % # " ( # 8 ( 8 ( ) > ? be mo­dern of­ten end up buil­ding craft that are hor­ri­bly ugly ( ) Q % % ? # " " ) X Y " [ ) 7 pro­du­ces an ugly sha­pe, it’s ti­me to call a halt. Boa­ts ha­ve to

" # # # ( # " ) Lar­ge ves­sels su­ch as Mar­tin Fran­cis/ Lürs­sen’s Echo and the 1 12 4 ( # # # ( " # ) % # % craft, par­ti­cu­lar­ly pro­duc­tion ones, ha­ve aban­do­ned any sty­le or ae­sthe­tic am­bi­tion. Mo­re thought is re­qui­red at the de­si­gn sta­ge " " # ( ? $ " ) % # % # # $ # ] " # "#% # # " " # # % " ruin the en­ti­re sec­tor in the long term. A ge­ne­ra­tion of hi­deous ( " ) # ) Da un pa­io di de­cen­ni gli ya­cht si stan­no “apren­do” al ma­re gra­zie al­le nuo­ve tec­no­lo­gie dei ve­tri, sem­pre più re­si­sten­ti e mo­del­la­bi­li in sva­ria­te for­me e cur­va­tu­re. In que­sto mo­do le bar­che ab­ban­do­na­no il vec­chio con­cet­to ar­ca-di-Noè, do­ve ci si rin­chiu­de per so­prav­vi­ve­re al di­lu­vio uni­ver­sa­le, per di­ven­ta­re sem­pre più del­le vil­le gal­leg­gian­ti in gra­do non so­lo di re­si­ste­re ai ma­ro­si, ma an­che di far go­de­re il ma­re e la na­tu­ra ma­ri­na ai suoi ospi­ti. " " "# " $" % tra­spa­ren­ti, sem­pre più gran­di ed evi­den­ti. Dal pun­to di vi­sta del­la si­cu­rez­za, non è un pro­ble­ma per­ché i ve­tri che sop­por­ta­no l’im­pat­to di pro­iet­ti­li di gros­so ca­li­bro, reg­go­no tran­quil­la­men­te l’im­pat­to di gran­di on­de. Dal pun­to di vi­sta este­ti­co, que­sta ten­den­za pe­rò ge­ne­ra non so­lo bar­che più bel­le ma an­che ob­bro­bri gal­leg­gian­ti. Can­tie­ri che cer­ca­no mag­gio­ri mo­ti­vi di ven­di­ta o ar­ma­to­ri che vo­glio­no es­se­re “più mo­der­ni” gra­zie a que­sta ca­rat­te­ri­sti­ca por­ta­no tal­vol­ta a co­strui­re bar­che mol­to brut­te se non ad­di­rit­tu­ra mo­struo­se. Co­me sem­pre, la cor­ret­ta via di mez­zo ' $ ( ) " “for­ma per la fun­zio­ne”, ma se la fun­zio­ne por­ta a una for­ma brut­ta cre­do ci si do­vreb­be fer­ma­re. Le bar­che ri­man­go­no de­gli og­get­ti che de­vo­no af­fa­sci­na­re in­nan­zi­tut­to per la lo­ro este­ti­ca, e non so­lo per la lo­ro fun­zio­ne pre­sta­zio­na­le. Ci so­no gran­di bar­che " "# * + " / 0 1 12 4 "# han­no in­tro­dot­to un uti­liz­zo nuo­vo e spre­giu­di­ca­to del­le gran­di ve­tra­te, ma af­fer­man­do uno sti­le ap­prez­za­to e co­pia­to ne­gli an­ni. Ul­ti­ma­men­te in­ve­ce ci so­no bar­che, so­prat­tut­to di pro­du­zio­ne di se­rie, che pur di ap­pli­ca­re ve­tra­te ab­ban­do­na­no qual­sia­si sti­le e

( 5 " ) 7 (( 8 di pro­get­ta­zio­ne per tro­va­re so­lu­zio­ni sti­li­sti­che me­no or­ri­bi­li e al­tret­tan­to va­li­de eco­no­mi­ca­men­te. E co­mun­que i clien­ti, co­me i 5 % 9 $ ; eser­ci­zi che, se pur eco­no­mi­ca­men­te va­li­di nel bre­ve ter­mi­ne, ri­schia­no di ro­vi­na­re l’in­te­ro set­to­re nel lun­go ter­mi­ne. Per­ché una ge­ne­ra­zio­ne di bar­che brut­te al­lon­ta­ne­rà si­cu­ra­men­te mol­ti clien­ti nel lun­go ter­mi­ne e que­sto è un ri­sul­ta­to che nes­su­no si au­gu­ra!

Newspapers in Italian

Newspapers from Italy

© PressReader. All rights reserved.