Tablets could ex­pose stu­dents to hu­man traf­fick­ers – Dunn

Jamaica Gleaner - - NEWS - Al­bert Ferguson/Gleaner Writer

DR LEITH Dunn, head of the In­sti­tute for Gen­der and De­vel­op­ment Stud­ies at The Univer­sity of the West In­dies, Mona, be­lieves the Gov­ern­ment’s ‘Tablets-in-Schools Pro­gramme’ could be ex­pos­ing chil­dren to hu­man traf­fick­ers.

“So, we give the chil­dren the tablets in schools. They are techno na­tives, they know au­to­mat­i­cally how to do it and to surf, but the older per­sons, the par­ents the teach­ers, are less equipped to be able to deal with that,” Dunn said in re­sponse to ques­tions from The Gleaner.

Stu­dents at­tend­ing sev­eral pub­lic schools and teach­ers’ col­leges across the is­land have been us­ing tablet com­put­ers, that they have been re­ceiv­ing un­der the Gov­ern­ment’s ini­tia­tive, since 2014.

Dunn fur­ther noted that with so many chil­dren now hav­ing ac­cess to tablet com­put­ers and free ac­cess to the In­ter­net, the risk of be­ing ex­ploited, as they se­cretly surf the Dark Web, has in­creased.

“I am say­ing it is good that they have it (tablet com­put­ers), but we need to en­sure that they know how to pro­tect them­selves on­line,” said Dunn.

“We have to warn them about not putting out their per­sonal de­tails, whether it is im­ages, knowl­edge, or in­for­ma­tion that the preda­tors who are look­ing out for op­por­tu­ni­ties to ex­ploit chil­dren might be able to use to ex­ploit them,” added Dunn.

Back in 2014, shortly after the roll-out of the project, news sur­faced that a school­boy had cir­cum­vented the tablet soft­ware and had man­aged to ac­cess in­ap­pro­pri­ate web­sites.

“I am say­ing it is good that they have it (tablet com­put­ers), but we need to en­sure that they know how to pro­tect them­selves on­line.”

DUNN

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