GABRIEL LENGOIBONI: TOP TEACHER AIMS FOR GOVER­NOR

GABRIEL LENGOIBONI FOR­MER CEO OF THE TSC AND SAM­BURU COUNTY GOVER­NOR HOPE­FUL / Even though he ad­mits that he is not a politi­cian, Lengoiboni has hit the cam­paign trail and wants to be­come the next CEO of Sam­buru county. “I didn’t want politics, but I have

The Star (Kenya) - - Front Page - IBRAHIM ORUKO @orukoi

In the late 1980s Gabriel Lengoiboni made a tri­umphal re­turn from the UK, where he had at­tended the Lon­don School of Eco­nomics.

Young and am­bi­tious, he was armed with a Mas­ter’s de­gree in Sta­tis­tics that could have landed him a lu­cra­tive po­si­tion ei­ther in gov­ern­ment or the cor­po­rate sec­tor.

But, against great ex­pec­ta­tions, he opted for a re­turn to Sam­buru dis­trict to take over his old job as the Prin­ci­pal of Mar­alal High School.

“I went back to Mar­alal be­cause I wanted to en­cour­age chil­dren to at­tend school,” rem­i­nisces the im­me­di­ate for­mer CEO of the Teacher’s Ser­vice Com­mis­sion.

“Ed­u­ca­tion is crit­i­cal in na­tional de­vel­op­ment and the best way to em­power a peo­ple is to give them ed­u­ca­tion.”

Lengoiboni, who is an­gling to be­come the next gover­nor of Sam­buru county, says the en­abling en­vi­ron­ment for ed­u­ca­tion was bad.

There were few teach­ers in schools. The gen­eral per­for­mance of schools in na­tional ex­ams was poor.

Learn­ing was ham­pered by the fact that most par­ents did not ap­pre­ci­ate the im­por­tance of ed­u­ca­tion.

In the fi­nal anal­y­sis, the chal­lenges of pay­ing school fees all but un­der­mined ef­forts to em­power the peo­ple of the re­gion.

Upon his re­turn to the school, he was able to stim­u­late stu­dents, in both O- and A-lev­els, who ended up regis­ter­ing a string of splen­did per­for­mances.

In the same year he re­turned, his school was ranked num­ber 62 na­tion­ally, which im­proved to 59 and then 29 the same year he left to join the min­istry.

“That year we sent 47 out of 70 stu­dents to univer­sity,” he says with a mea­sure of sat­is­fac­tion. “The rest joined ter­tiary in­sti­tu­tions.”

Even though he ad­mits that he is not a politi­cian, Lengoiboni has hit the cam­paign trail and wants to be­come the next CEO of Sam­buru county.

“I didn’t want politics, but I have been un­der pres­sure from the peo­ple to go for the seat. I have obliged.”

In 2012, a del­e­ga­tion of el­ders from Sam­buru sum­moned and re­quested him to go for Gover­nor at the 2013 gen­eral elec­tion. He po­litely turned it down.

“My in­ter­est has al­ways been to serve my peo­ple, but at that time I was giv­ing ser­vice to the na­tion. The TSC was a ma­jor call,” he says.

He turned down the pro­posal be­cause the TSC was go­ing through a high-level tran­si­tion – from an or­di­nary to a con­sti­tu­tional com­mis­sion.

“UPON HIS RE­TURN TO THE SCHOOL, HE WAS ABLE TO STIM­U­LATE STU­DENTS, IN BOTH O- AND A-LEV­ELS, WHO ENDED UP PER­FORM­ING WELL.”

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