Arab Times

Dis­cov­ery

- Ecology · Infectious Diseases · Health Conditions · Arnold Schwarzenegger · California · Los Angeles · Vienna · Republican Party (United States) · Donald Trump · T. Rex · Christie's · Manhattan · South Dakota · Rockefeller Center · LEGO Education WeDo · Hassenfeld Brothers

‘Use stim­u­lus funds – Arnie’:

Gov­ern­ment stim­u­lus pro­grams de­signed to keep coun­tries afloat dur­ing the coro­n­avirus pan­demic of­fer “a tremen­dous op­por­tu­nity” to build a clean-en­ergy econ­omy, ac­tor and for­mer Cal­i­for­nia gov­er­nor Arnold Sch­warzeneg­ger said Thurs­day.

Sch­warzeneg­ger called on govern­ments not to “in­vest in the past,” say­ing that “for­ward-look­ing de­ci­sions” are needed now as tril­lions are be­ing poured into re­build­ing economies around the globe.

“These funds are so mas­sive they’re ca­pa­ble of re­mak­ing so­ci­eties; we have a tremen­dous op­por­tu­nity here,” Sch­warzeneg­ger said while speak­ing by video link from Los An­ge­les to the Aus­trian World Sum­mit in Vi­enna, an off­shoot of his cli­mate ini­tia­tive. “All we have to do is pick it up.”

Since leav­ing po­lit­i­cal of­fice in 2011, the Aus­trian-Amer­i­can ac­tor has de­voted time to en­vi­ron­men­tal causes. A Repub­li­can, he has sparred with US Pres­i­dent Don­ald Trump over cli­mate is­sues.

“When you hear that gov­ern­ment plans to spend stim­u­lus money bail­ing out fos­sil fu­els, we must ask our­selves: if in­vestors aren’t sup­port­ing those de­clin­ing com­pa­nies, why should tax­pay­ers?” Sch­warzeneg­ger said. “Gov­ern­ment must re­al­ize what the smart money knows in­stinc­tively: don’t in­vest in the past.”

Sch­warzeneg­ger said ef­fi­cient uses of money would in­clude mak­ing build­ings more en­ergy-ef­fi­cient and weath­er­proof, in­stalling en­ergy-ef­fi­ciency ap­pli­ances, cars us­ing al­ter­na­tive fu­els and plant­ing trees. (AP)

T rex goes up for auc­tion:

He weighed at least 7 tons and had eyes the size of base­balls. His bite could have crushed a car. He bore scars from fierce pre­his­toric bat­tles.

All this could be yours for as much as $8 mil­lion.

The leg­end of the Tyran­nosaurus rex nick­named Stan is get­ting fresh life thanks to Christie’s. The auc­tion house put his bones on dis­play start­ing Wed­nes­day through floor-to-ceil­ing win­dows at its mid­town Man­hat­tan gallery in ad­vance of putting them up for auc­tion.

“He is 37 feet long and one of the fiercest killing ma­chines that has ever roamed the earth,” said James Hys­lop, head of the auc­tion house’s science and nat­u­ral his­tory de­part­ment.

About 67 mil­lion years after Stan did all that roam­ing and killing, his re­mains were dis­cov­ered in 1987 by pa­le­on­tol­o­gist Stan Sacri­son in a ge­o­log­i­cal area in the Mid­west known as the Cre­ta­ceous Bad­lands.

The fos­sils be­came known for form­ing one of the most in­tact di­nosaur skele­tons ever dis­cov­ered. Re­searchers also mar­veled at how the skull had large punc­ture wounds, spec­u­lat­ing that they were the result of T. rex war­fare.

The skele­ton - be­ing put up for sale by the Black Hills In­sti­tute in South Dakota - will re­main on dis­play through Oct 21 at Christie’s flag­ship lo­ca­tion at Rock­e­feller Cen­ter. The auc­tion is set for Oct. 6.

Hys­lop as­sured po­ten­tial buy­ers that Stan “is be­ing of­fered with no re­serve. So ab­so­lutely ev­ery­one has a shot at him.” (AP)

Lego to ditch plas­tic bags:

Lego has said that it will stop us­ing plas­tic bags in­side its boxed sets and re­place them with pa­per ones.

The Dan­ish toy­maker said it will start mak­ing the switch next year and ex­pects plas­tic bags to be com­pletely phased out in the next five years. The bags are used to hold loose bricks in boxed sets.

Lego, as well as other big brands, have been look­ing for ways to cut plas­tic use in or­der to please cus­tomers in­creas­ingly wor­ried about how their pur­chases im­pact the en­vi­ron­ment. Monopoly maker Has­bro, for ex­am­ple, has also an­nounced plans to elim­i­nate plas­tics in its pack­ag­ing.

Among the en­vi­ron­men­tal is­sues posed by plas­tic is that it doesn’t dis­in­te­grate. In­stead, it breaks down into tiny pieces that can be eaten by birds or other wildlife, en­dan­ger­ing their health.

“We have been ex­plor­ing al­ter­na­tives for some time and the pas­sion and ideas from chil­dren in­spired us to be­gin to make the change,” said Lego CEO Niels B.

Chris­tiansen, in a pre­pared state­ment.

 ??  ?? Anin­dita Mi­tra, 61, poses with a por­trait of her hus­band late Narayan Mi­tra, at her house in Silchar, In­dia on Sept 13. Mi­tra wasn’t listed among those killed by the coro­n­avirus that au­thor­i­ties put out daily be­cause the test re­sults con­firm­ing COVID-19
ar­rived after his death. (AP)
Anin­dita Mi­tra, 61, poses with a por­trait of her hus­band late Narayan Mi­tra, at her house in Silchar, In­dia on Sept 13. Mi­tra wasn’t listed among those killed by the coro­n­avirus that au­thor­i­ties put out daily be­cause the test re­sults con­firm­ing COVID-19 ar­rived after his death. (AP)
 ??  ?? Stan, one of the largest and most com­plete Tyran­nosaurus rex fos­sil dis­cov
ered, is on dis­play on Sept 15, at Christie’s in New York. (AP)
Stan, one of the largest and most com­plete Tyran­nosaurus rex fos­sil dis­cov ered, is on dis­play on Sept 15, at Christie’s in New York. (AP)
 ??  ?? Chris­tiansen
Chris­tiansen
 ??  ?? Arnie
Arnie

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