FEA­TURE: NEXT-LEVEL BROWS

FULL BROWS ARE ALL THE RAGE NOW AND WE STAND IN AWE OF STARS LIKE EMILIA CLARKE AND LILY COLLINS AS THEY GRACE THE RED CAR­PETS SPORT­ING THE LOOK. BUT WHAT ABOUT THOSE WHO ARE CHAL­LENGED IN THIS AREA? ILI­CIA ALIAS FINDS OUT MORE ABOUT THE NEW BROW ENHANCEM

Female (Malaysia) - - CONTENTS -

Down over your brows’ con­di­tion? Give them a makeover with mi­crob­lad­ing.

Back in an­cient Egypt, it has been said that a bold brow rep­re­sented power and Cleopa­tra was be­lieved to have dark­ened her eye­brows with car­bon to ex­ag­ger­ate her nat­u­ral arches. While our love of thick face framers is now at an all-time high, the same can­not be said as we go through the 20th cen­tury. In the ’20s, ac­tress Clara Bow set a trend by pluck­ing her brows to obliv­ion and draw­ing on a thin line down towards her tem­ples, which fol­lowed into the sub­se­quent decades un­til Joan Craw­ford de­cided to grow hers out in the ’50s, start­ing a new move­ment of nat­u­ral, feath­ered brows. And who could for­get a teenage Brooke Shields with her iconic brows in a Calvin Klein Jeans com­mer­cial from the ’80s? Sure, those who are blessed with thick tufts of hair that rest be­low the fore­head can cel­e­brate this trend, but what about those who are deal­ing with sparse, light or barely-there brows? Can they em­brace this trend too? As it turns out, yes they can, thanks to mi­crob­lad­ing. I’ve al­ways won­dered about the hype since it sur­faced in the USA so I de­cided to get more in­for­ma­tion on this new cut­ting-edge pro­ce­dure. WHAT IS MI­CROB­LAD­ING? Asia is no stranger to eye­brow en­hance­ment pro­ce­dures; from tint­ing to em­broi­dery and per­ma­nent tat­too­ing, we’ve seen them all. Re­mem­ber see­ing older women with blueish-green eye­brows? You can be sure that it’s the re­sult of eye­brow tat­too­ing. This new pro­ce­dure, how­ever, is loved by men and women alike and is mak­ing waves in Malaysia with more flat­ter­ing nat­u­ral shades. It’s a form of semi-per­ma­nent tat­too that in­volves us­ing tiny nee­dles that make up a small blade, sim­i­lar to a scalpel to scratch tiny lines mim­ick­ing hairs on the sur­face of the skin to de­posit pig­ment un­der­neath. If done prop­erly, it’ll be im­pos­si­ble to tell if you have drawn on brows or they’re com­pletely nat­u­ral.

WHO IS IT FOR?

It’s for ev­ery­one (mostly)! Whether you have sparse or thin­ning brows or pre­fer to sleep in longer in the morn­ing and have your brows drawn on the sec­ond you wake up, this en­hance­ment pro­ce­dure has your name writ­ten all over it as it’s sub­tle and rel­a­tively pain­less. What’s bet­ter: it lasts up to two years with proper TLC. It’s a win-win, re­ally! Now, those with sen­si­tive skin or those who have skin that tends to bleed eas­ily might want to con­sult a doc­tor or der­ma­tol­o­gist to de­ter­mine if there are any side ef­fects to their con­di­tion be­fore get­ting this treat­ment done.

Here are a few other things that you’ll need to keep in mind:

PRE-PRO­CE­DURE PREP

It’s best that you don’t wax your eye­brows be­fore an ap­point­ment since it can ir­ri­tate the skin and the re­sults wouldn’t last as long. Also, skip any ex­fo­li­at­ing or acne treat­ments and avoid blood thin­ners or al­co­hol for at least two weeks be­fore the pro­ce­dure as ex­ces­sive bleed­ing may pre­vent the pig­ment from ab­sorb­ing into the skin. Mi­crob­lad­ing re­quires get­ting lots of mi­cro-cuts on your skin, so if you take blood thin­ners, it will make you less likely to clot.

AFTERCARE

Tra­di­tion­ally, this pro­ce­dure will last up to a year but some do go up to three years with the eye­brows look­ing quite nat­u­ral. It dif­fers cos of your skin type, ap­pli­ca­tion process and pres­sure, pig­ment used and the aftercare. For the first 10 days af­ter the pro­ce­dure, you’ll need to keep the brows as dry as pos­si­ble. No wa­ter or skin­care creams are al­lowed around the brow area as it may re­sult in the ink be­ing washed out and de­lay the heal­ing process of the scab.

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