THE FU­TURE IS BRIGHT

Age is just a num­ber when it comes to the next gen­er­a­tion step­ping up to make our world a bet­ter place.

Herworld (Malaysia) - - HER LIFE -

With this be­ing the Teens Is­sue’ we’re high­light­ing the many young tal­ents in our midst. While hon­ing their skills in pur­suit of their dreams, they’re also mak­ing a dif­fer­ence in the com­mu­nity – with some even putting Malaysia on the map with their con­tri­bu­tions to so­ci­ety. Af­ter read­ing this, you may catch your­self rem­i­nisc­ing about what you were do­ing at their age (we cer­tainly did)!

IN­SPIR­ING OTH­ERS

Bud­ding artists, au­thors, car­toon­ists, and mu­si­cians – Shel­don and Emer­son Chong have won many art com­pe­ti­tions in ad­di­tion to pub­lish­ing their very own comic books. The young broth­ers have also carved out the time to con­duct art work­shops to share their knowl­edge with oth­ers, who in turn in­spire them.

SER­ENA’S SE­CRET

Ser­ena Zara Tau­fiq was one of our kid ed­i­tors last year and when she told us about her ven­tures, we were amazed. Ser­ena’s Se­cret – Help­ing Autis­tic Chil­dren, One At A Time was birthed out of the com­pas­sion she has for her sis­ter, whose speech ther­apy she helped to fund by sell­ing her very own hand­made ac­ces­sories. Prov­ing that she has the mind of an en­tre­pre­neur, her fu­ture plans in­clude em­ploy­ing those who are autis­tic so they can make their own liv­ing.

HAVE A CUPPA

At the ten­der age of nine, Shailaja Grace is al­ready the CEO of Bloom Tea – founded by her in 2016. The rea­son she be­came a tea en­tre­pre­neur is that when she was three years old, her grand­mother made her tea when­ever she was sick and that made her feel bet­ter. We tried Moon­beam – one of the two tea blends she’s cre­ated – and love its sooth­ing aroma (it’s re­ally pretty to look at too, with dif­fer­ent-coloured in­gre­di­ents). She also started a char­ity, Lit­tle Hands, Big Heart, that pro­vides school sup­plies to less-for­tu­nate chil­dren. 10 per cent of Bloom Tea’s pro­ceeds go to it.

IN­NO­VA­TION THAT KNOWS NO BOUNDS

This year, two Malaysians have been awarded the Queen’s Young Lead­ers Award for their in­no­va­tive so­lu­tions to cur­rent global is­sues. One of them is Siva Na­gap­pan Visves­varana, who de­vel­oped var­i­ous so­lu­tions to im­prove daily re­cy­cling – en­abling rain­wa­ter to be stored in a frac­tion of the space typ­i­cally re­quired. He also co-founded Project Paplet, an or­gan­i­sa­tion that trans­forms used pa­per into book­lets, which are then do­nated to 50 refugee schools around Malaysia.

THE WHIZ KID

A whiz be­hind the key­board, Lim Wern Jie is a self-taught de­vel­oper who learnt from watch­ing YouTube tutorials. Not only does he speak a few lan­guages, he’s also flu­ent in eight dif­fer­ent cod­ing lan­guages. Although still in his teens, he has 50 ap­pli­ca­tions un­der his name. The most down­loaded of th­ese is the Phone Se­cu­rity Alarm and it’s got good re­views on Ap­ple’s App Store.

A DIF­FER­ENT EX­PRES­SION

At the age of two, Yap Hanzhen was di­ag­nosed with autism. Now 20, he jets across the world to ex­hibit his de­tailed and heart­felt sketches, which are his out­let for ex­pres­sion. Hanzhen uses his pho­to­graphic mem­ory to cre­ate e each art­work – an ex­act replica of the real thing but on p pa­per. He has pub­lished five sketch books that form a se­ries ser called Sketches By Hanzhen.

www.herin­spi­rasi.com

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Malaysia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.