THE SIL­VER SCREEN

WE LOOK TO CLAS­SIC FILMS FOR IN­SPI­RA­TION; GET TH­ESE STUN­NING HOME AC­CES­SORIES TO SET THE MOOD FOR A GLAMOROUS EVENING.

Home & Decor (Malaysia) - - Trends - text CHA­RINA SIGUTY

Bring the style of your favourite Hol­ly­wood movies into your home. Chan­nel your in­ner diva with gump­tion and cre­ativ­ity with th­ese de­lec­ta­ble pieces. Cre­ate a com­fort­able am­bi­ence with warm light­ing to set the mood. Com­ple­ment the bold pieces with sub­tle tones and neu­tral pal­ettes. For in­stance, use soft beige wall­pa­per as a back­ground and choose pas­tel grey fur­ni­ture. This gives the room a clean style while hints of sil­ver keep the room con­tem­po­rary. The key is in the con­trasts and in cre­at­ing an el­e­ment of re­fine­ment.

COM­PLE­MENT THE BOLD PIECES WITH SUB­TLE TONES AND NEU­TRAL PAL­ETTES TO YOUR HOME DECOR.

who JEAN-BAP­TISTE OUDEA

why THROUGH HIS SHOP APHO­RISM AN­TIQUES, HE WANTS TO BRING AN AP­PRE­CI­A­TION OF FINE EURO­PEAN AND ASIAN AN­TIQ­UI­TIES TO EV­ERY­ONE

what gets him out of bed in the morn­ing

“SO MANY BEAU­TI­FUL WORKS OF ART TO FIND IN THE WORLD, SO LIT­TLE TIME!”

We never thought we’d stum­ble upon a charm­ing store stock­ing fine Euro­pean and Asian an­tiques from the late 18th and early 19th cen­turies among the shop­houses of sleepy Tiong Bahru. Jean-Bap­tiste Oudea started Apho­rism An­tiques ear­lier this year, and the af­fa­ble French­man chose to site the shop in this area pre­cisely be­cause “it’s one of the few places in Sin­ga­pore where you have a feel of his­tory.”

Hav­ing lived in Sin­ga­pore for 23 years (he’s mar­ried to a Sin­ga­porean), the ex-banker is now liv­ing the life he would have if he had gone into his fam­ily’s an­tique busi­ness in­stead of bank­ing. This pas­sion was never lost, how­ever, but sim­ply kept on the back burner (he started buy­ing small Asian col­lectibles when he was 13).

Now, his mis­sion with the store is to stim­u­late peo­ple’s cu­rios­ity about clas­si­cal an­tiques. Al­though the col­lec­tion dis­played is im­pres­sive – a huge six-panel 1700s Ja­panese screen is dis­played at one end of the shop, to­gether with stately 18th-to-early-20th cen­tury French ma­hogany fur­ni­ture, an ar­chi­tect’s ta­ble from the 1800s, and smaller cu­rios clus­tered in dis­play show­cases – Jean-Bap­tiste says he doesn’t want the space to be a mu­seum. He hand­picks pieces he feels have a style (and size) that would go with con­tem­po­rary in­te­ri­ors, and keeps prices af­ford­able for the more com­mon pieces of that time (for ex­am­ple, an early 20th-cen­tury re­volv­ing li­brary is go­ing for $2,800 and orig­i­nal black-and-white framed pho­tog­ra­phy prints for $90). “I do ev­ery­thing my­self, so cus­tomers pay for the value of the piece and not for ex­tras such as lo­gis­tics,” he ex­plains, say­ing that his prices are sim­i­lar to what you would pay if you were to buy the piece in Paris or Lon­don.

And when a buyer finds some­thing they love or when he finds the item for them, Jean-Bap­tiste feels sat­is­fied, too. “There aren’t many jobs that give you this sense of joy – and cer­tainly not bank­ing!” he smiles. Apho­rism An­tiques is lo­cated at #01-51, Blk 72 Seng Poh Road, Sin­ga­pore, www.apho­rism.com.sg.

who ONG KER-SHING AND JOSHUA COMAROFF

why THE OWN­ERS OF LIFE­STYLE STORE STRANGELET­S HAVE JUST PUB­LISHED AN AR­CHI­TEC­TURE BOOK WITH A POP-CUL­TURE TWIST

what gets them out of bed in the morn­ing “THE DE­SIRE TO BE SUR­PRISED.”

“Talk­ing about build­ings in ar­chi­tec­tural jar­gon just isn’t as fun as com­par­ing them to some­thing more fa­mil­iar, such as mon­sters,” says Joshua Comaroff of Hor­ror in Ar­chi­tec­ture, a book he co-wrote with his wife and busi­ness part­ner, Ong Ker-Shing. “That’s the whole idea be­hind the book – we wanted to help our­selves bet­ter ar­tic­u­late what we saw.” Hav­ing known each other for al­most 15 years, the cou­ple, who also head de­sign firm Lekker De­sign and quirky con­cept store Strangelet­s to­gether, spend a lot of time dis­cussing their ar­chi­tec­tural in­ter­pre­ta­tions – which even­tu­ally be­came the back­bone of this pa­per­back.

The “hor­ror” in this book refers not to the dis­taste­ful ele­ments of build­ings, but rather, how both fa­mous and ob­scure ar­chi­tec­tural works mir­ror the themes com­mon in hor­ror movies. While the cou­ple is backed by an aca­demic back­ground in ar­chi­tec­ture (they met at Har­vard’s Grad­u­ate School of De­sign), this book isn’t just for the learned few. Ker-Shing ex­plains that it doesn’t even have to be read in a lin­ear way. “The in­tro­duc­tion is quite aca­demic. But you can skip that and go into the chap­ters, which teach vis­ual think­ing but are en­ter­tain­ing, too,” she says. So, ex­pect to be amused by the well-known works of ar­chi­tects Frank Fur­ness, Louis Kahn and Mies van der Rohe (as well as lo­cal struc­tures) with the help of zom­bies, freaks, and other char­ac­ters in B-grade hor­ror flicks.

As first-time au­thors, Joshua and Ker-Shing both learnt that pub­lish­ing a book in­volves a lot more than just writ­ing it. “Hunt­ing for the pho­tos was the big­gest chal­lenge,” re­calls Joshua. The multi-task­ing cou­ple have been si­mul­ta­ne­ously work­ing on a few other books, and the next one to be pub­lished (hope­fully be­fore the end of the year, says Joshua) touches on small space liv­ing in Shang­hai.

Hor­ror in Ar­chi­tec­ture is avail­able at Ki­noku­niya.

above Get an in­stant ed­u­ca­tion in clas­si­cal an­tiques by pop­ping in to chat with JeanBap­tiste. right This French ar­chi­tect’s ta­ble from the 1800s al­lows the user to work while stand­ing, too.

above Limited edi­tion hand­printed art piece en­gi­neered with framed wood and per­spex. Sean Con­nery, 1964 art pe­ice from www. made.com.

top Large oval mir­ror with faceted bor­der. Schön­buch, EPOCA mir­ror from, www.schoen­buch. com. right Wood crafted fin­ish, Navy Tri­pod Floor Lamp, www.made.com. bot­tom Light­weight All Black Alu­minum Makeup Artist Di­rec­tor Chair, www. mon­ster­mar­ket­place.com

De­sign­ers, store own­ers, par­ents and now au­thors, multitaski­ng is Ker-Shing and Joshua’s way of life. be­low Their book is a fun ap­proach to ob­serv­ing ar­chi­tec­ture.

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