ONE FOR THE TEAM

Home & Decor (Malaysia) - - CONTENTS - PHO­TOG­RA­PHY DARREN CHANG ART DI­REC­TION NONIE CHEN

Like a mar­riage, de­sign­ing a home re­quires a col­lab­o­ra­tive ef­fort for best re­sults.

Like a mar­riage, de­sign­ing a home re­quires a col­lab­o­ra­tive ef­fort for the best re­sults. Here are some point­ers on how the in­te­rior de­sign here was guided by the own­ers’ per­son­l­i­ties.

Ken­neth Sim and Lee Xin­rong’s jour­ney to­wards get­ting their home be­gan when they were still in univer­sity. They’d al­ready been dat­ing for a few years when the cou­ple de­cided to ap­ply for a flat even be­fore grad­u­a­tion. Af­ter about a four-year wait, they fi­nally col­lected the keys to their mat­ri­mo­nial home in 2017.

They came across Three-d Con­ceptwerke while brows­ing through mag­a­zines. The firm’s eclec­tic style caught their eye, but it was in­te­rior de­signer Meiyi Li’s abil­ity to in­cor­po­rate an un­der­stand­ing of their life­style and per­son­al­i­ties into her de­sign vi­sion that ul­ti­mately won the cou­ple over.

Start­ing with the din­ing area, Ken­neth and Xin­rong have friends and fam­ily over for meals quite of­ten. The orig­i­nal was a small cor­ner just be­yond the kitchen. Meiyi sug­gested that it should take pride of place in what would oth­er­wise have been the liv­ing room. “The zon­ing works well. Our guests mostly gather around the din­ing area once they en­ter. This helps to main­tain the pri­vacy of the bed­rooms,” says Xin­rong.

And, de­pend­ing on where they are seated at the Crate & Bar­rel rec­tan­gu­lar din­ing ta­ble with a mar­ble top and aged brass legs, visi­tors get to en­joy dif­fer­ent views: an ex­tended, un­blocked vista of the out­side from the 33rd floor, the gallery wall be­hind the ta­ble with pictures and images they’ve col­lected over the years, and a se­ries of turquoise walls, which bal­ance out the warm colours, which Ken­neth says, make them feel like they’re on a stay­ca­tion ev­ery time they come home.

The liv­ing room is rep­re­sented as a cosy al­cove cre­ated from the hack­ing of one of the three bed­rooms. As the pair sel­dom watch TV, its less prom­i­nent lo­ca­tion suits them just fine. In fact, they took it two steps fur­ther by pur­chas­ing the small­est TV they could find and putting it in a Gra­funkt rat­tan wardrobe.

The mas­ter bed­room is a lit­tle dif­fer­ent from the rest

of the flat, which has a darker colour pal­ette. “We kept to a brighter, lighter theme. I also rec­om­mended Ken­neth and Xin­rong opt for a low bed frame that makes the room look and feel more spa­cious,” ex­plains Meiyi. A pair of French doors add a unique touch.

The bath­rooms are truly In­sta-wor­thy. The most strik­ing el­e­ment in the com­mon bath­room has got to be the El­lie Cash­man De­sign flo­ral wall­pa­per on the up­per half of the walls and the beams.

Teamed with black and white sub­way tiles and floor mo­saics, a free­stand­ing wash basin with gold fix­tures, and a round mir­ror with a gold frame, this show­stop­ping bath­room is a blend of classic, mod­ern and Vic­to­rian luxe.

The mas­ter bath­room sports dark green sub­way tiles and frosted glass pan­els in the door. “I wanted a bou­tique­ho­tel feel and got a lot of ideas from Pin­ter­est as well as my trav­els,” says Xin­rong. The idea for the hexag­o­nal floor mo­saics

“THE OWN­ERS PUR­CHASED WHAT CAP­TURED THEIR HEARTS. THIS, IN MY OPINION, IS THE BEST WAY TO GO ABOUT DEC­O­RAT­ING A HOME.”

THE LIV­ING ROOM IS NOW MORE OF AN AL­COVE WITH A MAS­CU­LINE, CIGAR-ROOM AM­BI­ENCE

ar­ranged into repet­i­tive flo­ral mo­tifs were ac­tu­ally spot­ted by Xin­rong when she was in Tokyo. She loved it so much, she shared a photo with Meiyi, who helped her to recre­ate the ef­fect in the mas­ter bath­room.

The cou­ple fi­nally moved into their new home in mid2018, fol­low­ing eight weeks of ren­o­va­tion that cost RM240,000, in­clud­ing fur­nish­ings.

From its un­con­ven­tional lay­out and eclec­tic fur­ni­ture to the quirky home ac­ces­sories and bold wall­pa­per and colours in cer­tain ar­eas, this home is unique in a mul­ti­tude of ways. “The own­ers pur­chased what cap­tured their hearts. This, in my opinion, is the best way to go about dec­o­rat­ing a home,” says Meiyi. “It was a col­lab­o­ra­tive ef­fort. They ran their pref­er­ences by me, and I helped them to nar­row down the op­tions.”

The cou­ple calls this wall with its eclec­tic col­lec­tion of prints be­hind the Crate & Bar­rel din­ing ta­ble a “wall of com­pro­mise”. The chairs are by Nathan Yong De­sign, and the ab­stract ceil­ing light­ing is from Carousell.

RIGHT A No­den side­board pro­vides ad­di­tional stor­age and dis­play space for their ex­ten­sive col­lec­tion of knick-knacks.

BE­LOW The blue and white of the kitchen blends in nicely with the rest of the home.

LEFT Not your typ­i­cal bath­room, please, said the own­ers. The re­sult: a bold set-up that begs one to linger.

ABOVE To avoid clut­ter­ing up the space, the mas­ter bed­room’s fur­ni­ture was kept to a min­i­mum.

RIGHT The mas­ter bath­room isn’t just In­sta­gram­wor­thy, it is also prac­ti­cal. A wall­mounted ledge above the wash basin makes up for the lack of a van­ity counter.

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