Tatler Homes Malaysia

Transform the walls of your home into creative possibilit­ies

The walls of your home can be much more than just space dividers—elevate the look of your abode with these creative ideas

- By Hong Xinying and Michele Koh Morollo

“The walls of your bedroom are essentiall­y a canvas, not only for artwork or colour but also for your experience in the room,” says Alexandra Champalima­ud, founder of Champalima­ud Design. More than just a backdrop to your interior design scheme, a feature wall can, for instance, dramatical­ly change the mood and look of a room and elevate the overall aesthetic.

Accent walls present homeowners with a wonderful opportunit­y to mix and match various surface materials, colours and textures. By combining bright glazed tiles with marble, wainscotin­g, stone, or metallic-effect surfaces, Hong Kong-based design duo Vincent Lim and Elaine Lu of Lim + Lu have transforme­d bathrooms into alluring spaces. “Combining two types of materials in contrastin­g colours can really give a space a burst of energy.

The juxtaposit­ion of textures and colours brings a high level of excitement to the space,” says Lim.

When choosing your paint and wallpaper, be mindful of your emotional response to colours and prints. “Choose any colour or pattern that makes you feel good,” says Champalima­ud. “Make sure you’re certain about how you want to integrate a wall feature with the space. Do you want it to dominate, or is it an accent? Is the purpose of your choice to give the room personalit­y, or not? What is it that you want to enhance?” Ultimately, your interior should represent the things you love. A bold wall sporting a vibrant print may be off-putting if you’re accustomed to minimalist interiors, while neutral schemes might seem dull to people who prefer maximalist styles. “You must feel connected to what you decide to do, as it will impact the emotional relationsh­ip you have with the room; you want it to draw you in, let you focus and feel rested,” says Champalima­ud. As she sums it up: “It’s important to consider those things in your choices and make the decision for yourself.” Stumped on where to start? Get design inspiratio­n from the following pages.

“Combining two types of materials in contrastin­g colours can really give a space a burst of energy”

1. MATERIAL: WOODEN WARMTH

Organic walls of stone, wood or concrete bring the beauty of nature into your home. When choosing such materials for feature walls, co-founders Naoko Takenouchi and Marc Webb of Takenouchi Webb say it’s important to remember that natural surfaces will change with time and require care to maintain. “Don’t expect a feature wall of natural materials to be perfect, but appreciate the beauty in the imperfecti­ons,” says Takenouchi. “Integrate them into your space so they can take on a patina and change with time.”

In its Marina One showflats, Takenouchi Webb has created textural juxtaposit­ions by setting a flat-panelled wood wall adjacent to a wood wall with a ribbed pattern. “By creating a wall with contrastin­g sections, your eye can focus on different elements,” says Webb. “Either select two highly contrastin­g materials and colours, or use the same material with a different treatment. For example, do up one section in glossy wood and the other in a mattefinis­hed wood.”

2. STYLE: BLANK CANVAS

Even off-white walls can be made intriguing with a clever mix of textures and materials, as evident in Canvas House, a shophouse with refreshed interiors by Ministry of Design (MOD). Crafted as a co-living space for leasing firm Figment, the four-storey structure was imagined as a “proverbial blank canvas” with its deliberate lack of colour. Yet its white walls are anything but boring; the firm created various installati­ons and wall features to add tactile details to the abode.

One of its most distinctiv­e elements is a neon artwork encased in an aluminium box, featuring a quote by Thomas Jefferson, the third American president, which encapsulat­es the concept of this shophouse. “We love wall features that actually communicat­e an idea or convey a concept,” says Colin Seah, creative director of MOD.

“The quote, ‘I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past’ summarises the attitude of the house—it is a neutral white canvas for the future to be dreamt upon, rather than a wholesale homage to the past.”

3. STYLE: FLORAL FLAIR

Patterned wallpaper or fabric panels can also create a similar, mural-like effect. Botanical prints in particular continue to be a hit. When selected in subdued tones, these elegant motifs will add a graceful touch to any interior.

“I love to use Fromental or De Gournay’s hand-painted silk wallpapers on feature walls; they install impeccably and add a real ‘wow’ factor to an interior,” shares Pooley. Terri Tan, design director of Designworx Interior Consultant, agrees. “Wallpaper provides colour, pattern, sheen and texture. Handmade wallpaper is best as the handiwork gives the end result an unparallel­ed quality,” she says.

4. STYLE: WALL ART

A wall mural is an elegant way to bring a personalis­ed touch to your room. “If you opt for a mural, consider having the design start from the bottom of the wall and move upwards,” recommends Alexandra Champalima­ud, the founder of Champalima­ud

Design. “It’s also important to make sure the colour of the ceiling correspond­s to the colours in the mural as well; you could even consider doing a partial mural on three walls. Whatever the subject matter is, it needs to have depth and a story, and it needs to mesmerise you.”

5. FORM: BEAUTIFUL BONES

Add a graceful touch to your home with mouldings, which can instantly jazz up any space. Inspired by heritage homes, these decorative elements are making a comeback. They easily augment the charm of a newly built home, which may feature bare walls and angular proportion­s. “Mouldings are used to emphasise certain characteri­stics in a room,” says Champalima­ud.

“You don’t want the mouldings to be too shocking or too strong. For instance, well-designed baseboards can establish geometry in the room and frame the space beautifull­y.” Apply rectangula­r mouldings that run the full length of the wall, or opt for wainscotin­g— recessed or raised wooden panels that cover just the lower third of the wall. Besides contributi­ng to the visual impact of the interior, these panels can also add to the seamless look of your home.

6. FORM: DISPLAY SHELF

A full-height bookshelf is not just a dream feature for bibliophil­es; it can also visually heighten the sense of space in an interior while showcasing decor objects. Located within the Conrad Hangzhou hotel in China, the Li’an restaurant designed by AB Concept is a shining example—the Hong Kong-based firm was tasked to craft the overall interiors of the hotel as well as this establishm­ent. “As the Li’an restaurant has a high ceiling, using a full-height display amplifies the scale and also creates visual interest at different eye levels,” say Ed Ng and Terence Ngan, cofounders of AB Concept.

Floral motifs applied to the interior walls draw cues from the traditiona­l Chinese dishes served at Li’an, contributi­ng to its design narrative. “Artistic elements, such as the floral wall, resonate with the delicacies served in the restaurant.”

7. ACCENT: INDOOR GREENERY

Indoor plants can also be used to add more life along walls. “Plants can dramatical­ly change a space by adding life and colour to it,” says Marc Webb, co-founder of Takenouchi Webb. “Plants require regular care and maintenanc­e, so if you want to have them along your walls, it’s more practical to use shelving where you can place many potted plants rather than a built-in vertical green wall,” he adds. “That way, it’s also easier to move your plants around or update your wallshelf with new plants when needed. Speak to a nursery or a landscape designer to choose plants that are most suitable for your home.”

8. ACCENT: ARTWORKS

“For a long corridor, stairwell or a huge room, a gallery wall is perfect to add that personal touch in any home,” says Terri Tan, design director of Designworx

Interior Consultant. “To prevent mould forming on artworks or photograph­s in our humid climate, they should be framed with acid-free boards and covered with clear glass. A good alternativ­e is to opt for oil paintings as these withstand humidity well.” Wallcoveri­ngs can also enhance the impact of your gallery wall. “Wallpaper acts as a great backdrop to a collection of art, whether for framed photograph­s, maps or a mixed collection of art pieces; they offer a layered and eclectic look,” says Chloe Elkerton, founder of E&A Interiors.

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 ??  ?? Left to right: The CEDIT - Ceramiche d’italia Rilievi collection by Zaven comprises threedimen­sional ceramic tiles with a retro influence, while the Policroma collection by Cristina Celestino features textures inspired by marble and Marmorino plaster; both collection­s are available from Florim
Left to right: The CEDIT - Ceramiche d’italia Rilievi collection by Zaven comprises threedimen­sional ceramic tiles with a retro influence, while the Policroma collection by Cristina Celestino features textures inspired by marble and Marmorino plaster; both collection­s are available from Florim
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Marina One showflats designed by Takenouchi Webb combine wood panels in different textures to create visual interest
This page: The Marina One showflats designed by Takenouchi Webb combine wood panels in different textures to create visual interest
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 ??  ?? From top left: A bedroom designed by Katharine Pooley features floral wall panels lined with gold trimmings; the Uccelli wallpaper from Cole &
Son’s Fornasetti Senza Tempo collection, from Goodrich Global; a wall mural in shades of blue livens up a room in the Waldorf Astoria Chengdu hotel, designed by Champalima­ud
From top left: A bedroom designed by Katharine Pooley features floral wall panels lined with gold trimmings; the Uccelli wallpaper from Cole & Son’s Fornasetti Senza Tempo collection, from Goodrich Global; a wall mural in shades of blue livens up a room in the Waldorf Astoria Chengdu hotel, designed by Champalima­ud
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Tranquil Dawn, the Dulux Colour of the Year, adds a calming touch to this bedroom; in this project by Champalima­ud Design, the floral plasterwor­k goes beautifull­y with blue wainscotin­g in the Presidenti­al suite of Raffles Hotel Singapore; Katharine Pooley uses a soothing mix of pale blue box mouldings with grey fabric panels in this bedroom
From top left: Tranquil Dawn, the Dulux Colour of the Year, adds a calming touch to this bedroom; in this project by Champalima­ud Design, the floral plasterwor­k goes beautifull­y with blue wainscotin­g in the Presidenti­al suite of Raffles Hotel Singapore; Katharine Pooley uses a soothing mix of pale blue box mouldings with grey fabric panels in this bedroom
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 ??  ?? This page: Designed by Takenouchi Webb, potted plants liven up the living room of a showflat in Marina One; the grey wall serves as a graceful canvas for the artwork and colour furnishing­s in this bedroom by Designworx Interior Consultant
Opposite page: The fullheight shelves draw the eye upwards in the Li’an restaurant by AB Concept; the Dulux Tranquil Dawn paint colour on the wall complement­s the use of light wood in this room
This page: Designed by Takenouchi Webb, potted plants liven up the living room of a showflat in Marina One; the grey wall serves as a graceful canvas for the artwork and colour furnishing­s in this bedroom by Designworx Interior Consultant Opposite page: The fullheight shelves draw the eye upwards in the Li’an restaurant by AB Concept; the Dulux Tranquil Dawn paint colour on the wall complement­s the use of light wood in this room

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