Cougar shot dead for ap­par­ently killing a hiker at na­tional for­est trail

The Borneo Post - Good English - - Short Story Section -

Depart­ment of Fish and Wildlife search crew mem­bers have shot the cougar they sus­pect killed hiker Diana Bober on a Mt. Hood Na­tional For­est trail.

Re­lated: Ore­gon’s First-Ever Fa­tal Cougar At­tack In the Wild Kills Woman Hik­ing In Mt. Hood Na­tional For­est

Ac­cord­ing to a re­lease from ODFW, first re­ported by the Ore­go­nian, the adult fe­male cat was caught on cam­era travers­ing the scene of Bober’s at­tack. Three hours later, trained hounds sniffed her out and drove her up a tree, where searchers shot her.

Brian Wolfer, ODFW’s wa­ter­shed man­ager Ore­gon Depart­ment of Fish and Wildlife search crew mem­bers yes­ter­day shot the cougar they sus­pect killed hiker Diana Bober on a Mt. Hood Na­tional For­est trail.

Re­lated: Ore­gon’s First-Ever Fa­tal Cougar At­tack In the Wild Kills Woman Hik­ing In Mt. Hood Na­tional For­est

Ac­cord­ing to a re­lease from ODFW, first re­ported by the Ore­go­nian, the adult fe­male cat was caught on cam­era travers­ing the scene of Bober’s at­tack. Three hours later, trained hounds sniffed her out and drove her up a tree, where searchers shot her.

Brian Wolfer, ODFW’s wa­ter­shed man­ager and the per­son lead­ing the cougar hunt, said in a press brief­ing this morn­ing that there is still not con­fir­ma­tion that the cougar the agency shot is the one that killed Bober, but it is a strong pos­si­bil­ity. and the per­son lead­ing the cougar hunt, said in a press brief­ing this morn­ing that there is still not con­fir­ma­tion that the cougar the agency shot is the one that killed Bober, but it is a strong pos­si­bil­ity.

Diana Bober was of­ten haul­ing up and down the trails twist­ing through the Ore­gon wilder­ness in Mount Hood Na­tional For­est, an area of skyscrap­ing old growth trees, fresh air, In­sta­gram-wor­thy vis­tas of snow-touched peaks. Her work as a coun­sel­lor al­lowed the 55-year-old to pack a cou­ple of treks each week into her flex­i­ble sched­ule.

As her sis­ter told the Ore­go­nian, Bober had been an ac­tress in New York City and Los An­ge­les, then a pro­fes­sional Texas hold ‘em player in Las Ve­gas.

“She was very in­de­pen­dent and al­ways felt very safe on the trails,” Ali­son Bober told the pa­per.

But af­ter fail­ing to hear from Bober for a few days, rel­a­tives re­ported her miss­ing on Aug 29. Au­thor­i­ties lo­cated her 1996 Mazda Mi­ata last Fri­day parked at the Zigzag Ranger Sta­tion at the Salmon-Huck­le­berry Wilder­ness Area. Push­ing into the Hunch­back Trail, searchers dis­cov­ered her body two miles from the sta­tion. Clacka­mas County Sher­iff Craig Roberts had an­nounced Bober was likely killed by a wild cougar - an un­likely oc­cur­rence.

“From my un­der­stand­ing, this is the first at­tack by a cougar that took a life of an in­di­vid­ual in Ore­gon,” Roberts told re­porters at a news con­fer­ence.

There are around 6,600 wild cougars roam­ing across Ore­gon, Wolfer said. They’re ter­ri­to­rial an­i­mals, of­ten hug­ging to the same 15 to 40 square miles of wilder­ness. Each year, the state fields around 400 re­ports of cougars at­tack­ing live­stock.

But run-ins with hu­mans are rare. KOMO re­ported the only other ver­i­fied fa­tal cougar at­tack on a hu­man in state his­tory oc­curred in 2013. The in­ci­dent in­volved an an­i­mal in cap­tiv­ity turn­ing on a han­dler at a sanc­tu­ary. Bober’s death, if con­firmed as a cougar at­tack, would be a first for the state.

“This is a very tragic event. It’s an un­prece­dented event,” Wolfer said. “We don’t have in­di­ca­tion that things have changed and there’s an in­creased pub­lic threat from the av­er­age cougar. This cougar is one we want to be able to lo­cate for pub­lic safety.”

The at­tack isn’t the first cougar-re­lated death to grab head­lines re­cently. As The Washington Post pre­vi­ously re­ported in May, two bi­cy­clists out­side of Seat­tle were stalked and at­tacked by a cougar. One of the rid­ers, S.J. Brooks, was killed in the en­counter.

Both Brooks and Bober’s deaths re­main out­liers. Ac­cord­ing to the Washington Depart­ment of Fish and Wildlife, there have only been 125 re­ported cougaron-hu­man at­tacks in North Amer­ica over the last 100 years. Twenty-seven of the en­coun­ters were deadly.

– Agen­cies

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Malaysia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.