Good old days

The Borneo Post - Good English - - News -

“WHAT year were you born, Grandma?” Pa­tri­cia asked.

Pa­tri­cia was in sec­ond grade and her home­work as­sign­ment was to in­ter­view some­one born be­fore 1950 to see what their child­hood was like. She had cho­sen to talk to Grandma af­ter din­ner on Sun­day.

“I was born in 1943, dur­ing World War 2.” Pa­tri­cia’s Grandma an­swered.

“Did you go to school?” Pa­tri­cia asked.

“Yes, I went to school in Mayville.” Grandma said. “Did you take the school bus?” Pa­tri­cia asked with a frown. She didn’t like tak­ing the bus to school in the morn­ing. She thought it was smelly.

“No, dear. When I was a lit­tle girl most kids walked to school. Only kids that lived very far away got to ride the bus. I had to walk three blocks to school.”

“Well what did you do af­ter school Grandma?” Pa­tri­cia asked. “Did you watch TV and play video games?”

Pa­tri­cia’s Grandma laughed. “Of course not. We didn’t have video games back then. My fam­ily didn’t even get a TV un­til I was twelve.”

“No TV?” Pa­tri­cia said with a gasp. Grandma smiled and said, “Those were the good old days.”

Pa­tri­cia tried to imag­ine what life would be like with­out TV, video games, smart­phones and com­put­ers. She won­dered why grandma called her past “the good old days.”

Pa­tri­cia looked con­fused, and asked, “What did you do for fun?”

“Well, I read a lot of books. Af­ter din­ner and home­work, some­times we would lis­ten to the ra­dio while we coloured pic­tures or played card games. On the week­ends we mostly rode our bikes and played out­side with our friends.”

Just then Pa­tri­cia’s mom called out from the kitchen. It was time for dessert.

Pa­tri­cia quickly put down her pen­cil and pa­per. They were hav­ing fresh baked ap­ple pie with ice cream! She started to­ward the kitchen but then stopped and looked at Grandma.

“Grandma, did you have ice cream when you were a kid?” she asked.

“Yes, of course we did”, Grandma an­swered with a grin.

Pa­tri­cia smiled. “Then I think the ‘good old days’ were pretty good too. 2. When did Pa­tri­cia’s grand­mother get her tele­vi­sion? a. in 1943 b. in 1950 c. in 1955 d. in 1963 first

Ex­plain how you fig­ured out the an­swer to the ques­tion above.

3. List four things that Pa­tri­cia’s grandma did when she came home from school as a child.

4. Why didn’t Pa­tri­cia’s grandma take the bus to school when she was a child? a. She could not af­ford to take the bus. b. She lived too close to the school. c. She didn’t like tak­ing the bus to school. d. Buses had not been in­vented yet.

5. Why did Pa­tri­cia’s teacher as­sign the in­ter­view project? a. She wanted her stu­dents to learn when tele­vi­sion was in­vented. b. She wanted her stu­dents to learn about sci­ence. c. She wanted to per­suade her stu­dents to visit their grand­par­ents. d. She wanted her stu­dents to learn about life long ago.

Fill in the miss­ing let­ters to make a vo­cab­u­lary word from the story.

Then re-write the com­plete word on the line.

1. c h ___ l ___ h o o ___ __ clue: the time when a per­son was young

2. ___ n t e ___ ___ i e w __ clue: to ask ques­tions

3. d e ___ ___ e r ___ __ clue: sweet snack eaten af­ter din­ner

4. ___ a d i ____ __ clue: ma­chine for lis­ten­ing to sounds broad­cast through the air

5. g ___ i ___ __ clue: a broad smile

6. f ___ o w ___ __ clue: sad face

7. s ___ e l ___ y __ clue: stinky

8. g ___ ___ p __ clue: in­hale with a mouth open life

ago. long about learn to stu­dents her wanted She d. 5.

school.

the to close too lived She b.

week­ends.) on things these did she said Grandma( out­side. played and bikes rode ac­cepted: Not things.) these men­tioned also She( home­work. did and din­ner Ate ac­cepted: Also games. card Played pic­tures. ra­dio. the to Lis­tened books. Read 3. 1955. in TV a got fam­ily Her years. twelve Add 1943. in born was She 12. was she un­til TV a have didn’t her said grandma Pa­tri­cia’s story, the In 1955 in c.2. years 75 d.) 1. Coloured fam­ily ago

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