Why you should store flour and ap­ples in the fridge

Why store flour in the pantry where it can go stale and in a year, when you can dou­ble its shelf life in the fridge to two years? Store av­o­ca­dos on the counter un­til ripe and then place them in a low-hu­mid­ity drawer to gain five more days of shelf life.

The Borneo Post - Nature and health - - Nutrition -

GOOGLE has re­leased new tips on how to re­duce our en­vi­ron­men­tal foot­print which in­clude handy food waste tips like stor­ing flour, nuts and ap­ples in the fridge. On their in­ter­ac­tive site “Your Plan, Your Planet,” cre­ated with the Cal­i­for­nia Academy of Sciences, users can learn how their con­sump­tion of wa­ter, en­ergy and food – or in the lat­ter case, lack thereof -– im­pacts the planet.

Over­all, food pro­duc­tion ac­counts for more than twothirds of the world’s wa­ter use, and more than a quar­ter of car­bon diox­ide emis­sions, Google points out. That means that throw­ing out foods be­cause of poor stor­age prac­tices or a mis­un­der­stand­ing of ex­piry dates is also a waste the planet’s re­sources.

Here are a few stor­age tips on how to lengthen the (fridge) shelf life of foods and avoid wast­ing foods un- nec­es­sar­ily:

-Ap­ples ripen up to 10 times faster at room tem­per­a­ture. Stor­ing them in the fridge will keep them fresh and crisp for six weeks.

-Bread is also good for up to six months in the freezer, ver­sus a few days at room tem­per­a­ture. Pop slices in the toaster for fresh, warm bread.

-Lengthen the life of salad leaves and greens by prop­erly stor­ing them in a con­tainer lined with pa­per tow­els to ab­sorb mois­ture.

-Freez­ing foods to 0F in­ac­ti­vates mi­crobes like bac­te­ria, yeasts and moulds, which means that foods like beef re­main safe to eat in­def­i­nitely. Cooked beef is best eaten within three to four days when left in the fridge.

-Why store flour in the pantry where it can go stale and in a year, when you can dou­ble its shelf life in the fridge to two years? -Store av­o­ca­dos on the counter un­til ripe and then place them in a low-hu­mid­ity drawer to gain five more days of shelf life.

-Keep to­ma­toes out of the fridge where they lose their sweet­ness and tex­ture. In­stead, to­ma­toes should be stored on the counter away from di­rect sun­light for op­ti­mum flavour. -Don’t be fooled by the sell-by date on egg car­tons. They’re good for three more weeks. Hard-boiled eggs can like­wise be eaten a week af­ter boil­ing when kept in the fridge.

-Once opened, store nuts in the fridge to pre­vent them from go­ing ran­cid.

For more handy tips on how to re­duce your wa­ter and en­ergy con­sump­tion visit https://your­plany­our­planet. sus­tain­abil­ity.google/. - Re­laxnews

- iStock photo

Prop­erly stor­ing foods in the fridge can help fight food waste.

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