Orange juice, leafy greens and fruit could be good for a man’s mem­ory

Peo­ple who ate larger amounts of fruits and veg­eta­bles at the start of the study were less likely to de­velop think­ing and mem­ory prob­lems later in life, even if they were not eat­ing larger amounts around six years be­fore the mem­ory test.

The Borneo Post - Nature and health - - Front Page -

NEW RE­SEARCH in the US has found that men who in­clude veg­eta­bles and leafy greens, orange juice, and fruit in their diet may ben­e­fit from a lower risk of mem­ory loss as they age. Car­ried out by re­searchers at Har­vard T.H. Chan School of Pub­lic Health in Bos­ton, the new large-scale study looked at 27,842 men with an av­er­age age of 51. Par­tic­i­pants were asked to com­plete ques­tion­naires about how many serv­ings of fruits, veg­eta­bles and other foods they had each day at the start of the study, and then again ev­ery four years for 20 years.

They were then cat­e­gorised into groups de­pend­ing on their fruit and veg­etable in­take. The group who ate the high­est amount of veg­eta­bles ate around six serv­ings per day, com­pared to around two serv­ings for the low­est group. For fruits, the high­est group ate about three serv­ings per day, com­pared to half a serv­ing for the bot­tom group. A serv­ing of fruit is de­fined as one cup of fruit or ½ cup of fruit juice, and a serv­ing of veg­eta­bles is con­sid­ered to be one cup of raw veg­eta­bles or two cups of leafy greens.

The re­searchers also tested the par­tic­i­pants’ think­ing and mem­ory skills at least four years be­fore the end of the study, when they the av­er­age age of the group was 73. The find­ings, pub­lished in the jour­nal Neu­rol­ogy, showed that peo­ple who ate larger amounts of fruits and veg­eta­bles at the start of the study were less likely to de­velop think­ing and mem­ory prob­lems later in life, even if they were not eat­ing larger amounts around six years be­fore the mem­ory test.

In ad­di­tion, the team also found that the men who ate the most veg­eta­bles were 34 per cent less likely to de­velop poor think­ing skills than men who con­sumed the least amount of veg­eta­bles, while the men who drank orange juice ev­ery day were 47 per cent less likely to de­velop poor think­ing skills than men who drank less than one serv­ing per month.

The men who ate the most fruit each day were also less likely to see a de­cline in their think­ing skills, but the re­searchers found that this as­so­ci­a­tion was weak­ened after tak­ing into ac­count other di­etary fac­tors that could af­fect the re­sults, such as con­sump­tion of veg­eta­bles, fruit juice, re­fined grains, legumes and dairy prod­ucts.

“One of the most im­por­tant fac­tors in this study is that we were able to re­search and track such a large group of men over a 20-year pe­riod of time, al­low­ing for very telling re­sults,” said study author Changzheng Yuan. “Our stud­ies pro­vide fur­ther ev­i­dence di­etary choices can be im­por­tant to main­tain your brain health.” How­ever, the re­searchers pointed out that the study does not show cause and ef­fect, only that there is a re­la­tion­ship be­tween eat­ing fruits and veg­eta­bles and drink­ing orange juice and a re­duc­tion of mem­ory loss.–

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