Pres­sure mounts for Rakhine so­lu­tion

The Myanmar Times - Weekend - - News -

FACE­BOOK has an­nounced its third and big­gest purge of mil­i­tary-linked ac­counts in Myan­mar, after crit­ics charged that the so­cial net­work did too lit­tle to block in­flam­ma­tory ma­te­rial that fu­els com­mu­nal ha­tred and vi­o­lence, par­tic­u­larly against the coun­try’s Mus­lim mi­nor­ity in Rakhine State.

The so­cial me­dia gi­ant said in a state­ment Wed­nes­day that it had re­moved 425 Face­book pages, 17 groups and 135 ac­counts in Myan­mar for en­gag­ing in “co­or­di­nated in­au­then­tic be­hav­iour,” mean­ing they mis­rep­re­sented who was run­ning the provoca­tive ac­counts. It also re­moved 15 In­sta­gram ac­counts.

Face­book’s move ar­rived a day after Myan­mar and ASEAN dis­cussed the Terms of Ref­er­ence (TOR) that will for­malise their co­op­er­a­tion in the repa­tri­a­tion of refugees from north­ern Rakhine liv­ing in cramped camps in Bangladesh.

Min­is­ter of So­cial Wel­fare, Re­lief and Re­set­tle­ment U Win Myat Aye, said that the 10-mem­ber re­gional group, which in­cludes Myan­mar, was rep­re­sented at the dis­cus­sion by Sec­re­tary Gen­eral Lim Jock Hoi.“we will take ac­tion for co­op­er­a­tion after we dis­cuss the TOR,” he said.

U Aung Kyaw Zan, deputy per­ma­nent sec­re­tary of For­eign Af­fairs, said in­ter­na­tional pres­sure on the gov­ern­ment could be greatly re­duced as a re­sult of ASEAN be­ing not only a wit­ness to, but also an ac­tive par­tic­i­pant in, the process of repa­tri­a­tion that the Myan­mar gov­ern­ment has been car­ry­ing out.

“ASEAN can put in place the nec­es­sary mech­a­nisms for repa­tri­a­tion and we could im­ple­ment them ef­fec­tively if there is some­one fully sup­port­ing us,” U Aung Kyaw Zan said.

On Mon­day, busi­nesses and trade unions ap­pealed against the with­drawal of the Euro­pean Union’s Gen­er­alised Scheme of Pref­er­ences (GSP) cur­rently en­joyed by Myan­mar, pledg­ing that they will con­tinue to sup­port on­go­ing re­forms and pro­grammes to re­spect hu­man and labour rights that un­der­pin the grant­ing of the trade pref­er­ences.

The EU re­in­stated GSP for Myan­mar in 2013 as a means to pro­vide po­lit­i­cal, eco­nomic and so­cial sup­port to help the coun­try move to­ward democ­racy.

The re­moval of GSP serves only to ex­ac­er­bate the ex­ist­ing so­cio-eco­nomic hard­ships faced by a labour mar­ket that is still frag­ile and un­de­vel­oped, and the main im­pact would be felt by the poor through loss of liveli­hoods, which could de­rail re­forms and pro­grammes meant to achieve de­cent jobs and in­dus­trial peace, the state­ment said.

in the in­dus­try are more ad­ven­tur­ous while the vet­er­ans have good ideas and ex­pe­ri­ence in act­ing. The com­bi­na­tion makes good re­sults and many good movies have come out this year,” Arkar said.

Cur­rently, Arkar just fin­ished film­ing Kabar Na Htat and Kyo Phone and prepa­ra­tions are also be­ing made for a TV series and a movie that will be a col­lab­o­ra­tion be­tween Myan­mar and Thai­land, called Sleep­ing White.

“Sleep­ing White movie will be di­rected by both coun­tries. All the lo­ca­tions are in Thai­land. The lan­guage will be Thai for screen­ings there, while in Myan­mar, Burmese and English lan­guages will be used. It is a bit mys­te­ri­ous and has many ac­tion scenes. Ye Naung and An­gel La Mone will be star­ring in the movie along­side a Thai ac­tress. I hope to make it a dif­fer­ent ex­pe­ri­ence for Myan­mar’s movie fans.” he said.

Arkar en­cour­ages young peo­ple who want to join the in­dus­try to just take the plunge and give it a try.

“If you have the will, just throw your­selves into the in­dus­try,” he said.

Arkar said that he never stops learn­ing new tech­niques about his craft, but he also does not hes­i­tate to share his ex­pe­ri­ence and his knowl­edge about movie-mak­ing.

“On di­rect­ing and edit­ing, I nor­mally par­tic­i­pate in the work­shops ar­ranged by the Myan­mar Mo­tion Pic­ture Or­gan­i­sa­tion,” he said. “If there’s any or­gan­i­sa­tion that wants me to share my movie-re­lated ex­pe­ri­ence, they can just let me know. They are wel­come any­time.”

The young di­rec­tor said im­prov­ing the movie in­dus­try can be com­pared to de­vel­op­ing a prod­uct that will be sold to the mar­ket.

“It should be a qual­ity prod­uct; good agen­cies are needed to get it to good channels; prod­uct mar­kets should be big and also it should be some­thing many can con­sume.” Arkar said.

De­spite the suc­cess he has achieved in such a short time, Arkar re­mains as com­mit­ted and as de­ter­mined to pur­sue his dream of see­ing qual­ity Myan­mar movies – his movies in­cluded – screened in as many coun­tries as pos­si­ble.

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