LIV­ING COLOUR

GINNY GRANT LOOKS TO THE STREETS FOR CHOICE SNACKS.

Cuisine - - CONTENTS - Recipes & food styling Ginny Grant Pho­tog­ra­phy Aaron Mclean / Styling Fiona Las­celles

Ginny Grant brings street food into the kitchen

BEEF SHORT RIB KIM­CHI TACO recipe page 78

THE EX­PLO­SION OF food trucks and pop ups over the last few years has pro­vided a wealth of eat­ing op­tions. Beloved by many – es­pe­cially late-night rev­ellers – old-school street eats cover the realm of burg­ers, fish and chips and toasted sand­wiches. But there has been a change; many of those set­ting up food trucks today are chefs who are look­ing to do some­thing dif­fer­ent. And the attraction? They are rel­a­tively cheap to set up and run, com­pared to a restau­rant; con­cepts, menus and recipes can be tried and changed with the near-in­stant feed­back from cus­tomers; there is flex­i­bil­ity, too, in the use of so­cial me­dia to an­nounce when and where they will be sell­ing their prod­ucts.

So how does this fit into our New Zealand is­sue? As a young coun­try with a cor­re­spond­ingly young food cul­ture we take a mag­pie ap­proach to food, wel­com­ing the healthy diver­sity of foods from dif­fer­ent cul­tures. We are happy to snatch an in­gre­di­ent from one cui­sine and mash it with an­other without a slav­ish de­vo­tion to its ori­gins. And that is pretty much what is go­ing on in th­ese recipes. Street eats, from the clas­sic to modern-day mixes.

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