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Cuisine - - CONTENTS - Recipes, food styling & pho­tog­ra­phy Will Bow­man

Will Bow­man grills yak­i­tori for an out­door party

WILL BOW­MAN GETS HANDS ON & SAUCY WITH YAK­I­TORI TO MAKE EN­TER­TAIN­ING A BREEZE.

THE BAR­BE­CUE HAS BEEN the cen­tre­piece of the Kiwi sum­mer rou­tine for decades – and for good rea­son. Every coun­try has their own ver­sion of bar­be­cue, where smoke and fire are the trans­for­ma­tive el­e­ments and, tra­di­tion­ally at least, these cook­ing meth­ods have been ac­com­pa­nied by a strong so­cial el­e­ment. There’s some­thing about the sound and smell of some­thing cook­ing over fire that draws peo­ple in.

One of the sim­plest, clean­est and most in­clu­sive ways to make this style of cook­ing cen­tral to a gath­er­ing is with a Ja­panese hi­bachi or shichirin grill. Set it up in the mid­dle of the ta­ble with a tray of tit­bits for peo­ple to grill while chat­ting, as the aro­matic smoke wafts up from the coals. Or, if you are blessed with the space, re­sources and time, scale it up to a bon­fire and use the em­bers to set up a cook­ing space on its out­skirts, then you can have a few more friends round!

COOK­ING IN­STRUC­TIONS

Be­cause every fire is dif­fer­ent, cook­ing times are tricky to give ac­cu­rately here. It is a mat­ter of un­der­stand­ing the wood or coals you’re us­ing and ad­just­ing ac­cord­ingly.

Start cook­ing with the skin-side down, paint­ing the meat side with the tare (sauce). Try to do most of the cook­ing skin-side down, un­less the heat is too ag­gres­sive and is threat­en­ing to burn the skin.

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