BEEF BAVETTE WITH SPICE MIX

SERVES 6 -8 / PREPARATION 15 MINUTES PLUS MARINATING OVERNIGHT

Cuisine - - GUEST CHEF -

I nor­mally use cit­rus zest, salt, oil, gar­lic and fresh herbs to mar­i­nate meat. But I think beef can han­dle a lit­tle dried spice too, and it’s great with a lit­tle crust on the bar­beque. I started us­ing Kaitaia Fire chill­ies about six years ago and have never looked back. Their cayenne is so light and flaky and su­per hot! We use sec­ondary cuts in the res­tau­rant as a re­minder that there is a whole load of meat on a cow not just a fil­let and sir­loin. These cuts also work re­ally well on the bar­be­cue be­cause of their mar­bled fat and tex­ture.

FOR THE SPICE MIX

2 ta­ble­spoons co­rian­der seeds

1 ta­ble­spoon fen­nel seeds

2 ta­ble­spoons sea salt

2 ta­ble­spoons pep­per

1 lemon, zested

3 ta­ble­spoons sea­weed (I use Pa­cific Har­vest karengo or wakame work well in this sea­son­ing) 1 tea­spoon Kaitaia Fire cayenne

1 ta­ble­spoon kawakawa, thyme or avail­able fresh herb 200ml oil

1 beef bavette, flank or tri­tip (ap­prox 1kg)

Toast the co­rian­der and fen­nel seeds un­til fra­grant. Al­low to cool. Blitz the cooled seeds in a blender or spice grinder with the salt and pep­per­corns. Add the re­main­der of the in­gre­di­ents and mix un­til com­bined. Add 200ml of oil, then rub over the beef. Al­low to mar­i­nate overnight and let the salt work its magic.

Cook on a hot bar­beque on one side un­til well coloured. Turn over and cook onto the other side un­til coloured. If you have a meat ther­mome­ter or probe it now comes into its own. I like to cook a thin piece of beef ike this to around 45 de­grees which is rare but then rest in a warm place or off the di­rect heat for 10 minutes. Bavette has loads of mar­bled fat and it re­ally ben­e­fits from the rest. So you get a crispy edge and a ten­der cen­tre.

It will con­tinue cooking as it rests and come up to a core tem­per­a­ture of 55 de­grees which is how we serve it here at the res­tau­rant. Re­mem­ber if it is too rare for you af­ter the rest you can al­ways cook it a lit­tle more but you can’t cook it any less.

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