IN SEA­SON: NEC­TARINES A juicy fruit that is great sweet or savoury

FROM CAKES AND TARTS TO JAMS AND JELLIES, NEC­TARINES ADD A FRUITY, JUICY BURST TO MANY RECIPES

Food - - Contents - RECIPES & STYLING SO­PHIE GRAY PHO­TO­GRAPHS MELANIE JENK­INS

NEED TO KNOW

● Nec­tarines are a smooth­skinned peach, re­sult­ing from a mu­ta­tion whereby the gene re­spon­si­ble for fuzz is re­ces­sive. While nec­tarines are grown as a va­ri­ety in their own right, a reg­u­lar peach tree may pro­duce a smooth­skinned nec­tarine from time to time – and visa versa.

● ‘Nec­tarine’ means sweet as nec­tar, or nec­tar of the gods, and is be­lieved to have orig­i­nated in China.

● Since nec­tarines be­long to the same species as peaches, they can have white or yel­low flesh. Ripe nec­tarines vary in colour from green­ish yel­low to mostly red­dish with a hint of yel­low. A red­der skin doesn’t sig­nify riper fruit.

● When ripe, the fruit are fra­grant and give slightly to the touch. If a lit­tle un­der-ripe, leave at room tem­per­a­ture for two to three days. They can be stored in the fridge for three to five days.

● Nec­tarines are a good source of vi­ta­mins C and A and potas­sium. They are also abun­dant in an­tiox­i­dants and fi­bre.

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