ASK THE EX­PERT Our food ed­i­tor So­phie Gray cov­ers your queries

FROM ICE­CREAM DRIPS TO CHERRY PIPS, OUR ED­I­TOR SO­PHIE GRAY HAS THE AN­SWERS

Food - - Contents -

Q My bar­be­cue is a ba­sic one with­out a ther­mo­stat. How can I tell when it is hot enough or too hot for cook­ing dif­fer­ent foods?

A Al­ways pre­heat the grill for 20 min­utes be­fore at­tempt­ing to cook any­thing on a bar­be­cue, then hold your hand 12cm above the cook­ing grate. When it’s at a high tem­per­a­ture you won’t be able to leave your hand there for more than two sec­onds; when it’s medium you’ll man­age four to five sec­onds; and at medium-low about seven sec­onds is tol­er­a­ble.

Q My kids love ice­cream in a cone, but in the sum­mer it melts so quickly and the ice­cream drips out of the bot­tom. Can I pro­long the life of the ice­cream or cone so it can be eaten be­fore it ends up as a sticky mess on the floor?

A There are a few tricks you can try. Lin­ing ice­cream cones with melted choco­late makes them even more de­li­cious and cre­ates a mois­ture bar­rier. Use melted white or dark choco­late melts, spoon it in, tilt to coat, then turn up­side down on a foil-lined tray to set. Al­ter­na­tively, pop a cou­ple of mini marsh­mal­lows or Her­shey’s Kisses in the bot­tom of the cone so the ice­cream can’t drip out.

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