You’ve heard of FOMO, then meet its em­pow­er­ing op­po­site: JOMO, the ‘joy of miss­ing out’

IN NEED OF SOME ‘ALONE’ TIME? MORE AND MORE PEO­PLE ARE FIND­ING HOW EM­POW­ER­ING IT IS TO LET GO OF NEED­ING TO BE ‘IN THE KNOW’

Good Health Choices - - Content -

Whether it’s that twinge of re­gret when you see a pic­ture on In­sta­gram of your friends hav­ing a blast at that din­ner you ditched, or a nig­gling sus­pi­cion that shun­ning a work­mate’s house­warm­ing lost you some valu­able bond­ing time with your col­leagues, we all know about the in­fa­mous FOMO (fear of miss­ing out).

But these days, there’s an­other player in the game, and it’s not only the po­lar op­po­site of its bet­ter-known four-let­ter coun­ter­part, it’s also be­ing hailed as the an­swer to man­ag­ing stress and eas­ing anx­i­ety. Joy of miss­ing out, or JOMO, is all about savour­ing some soli­tude with­out car­ing what ev­ery­one else is do­ing. It’s turn­ing down in­vites and avoid­ing get-to­geth­ers with­out the worry of so­cial de­merit points. It’s about switch­ing off from so­cial me­dia, un­plug­ging from the world and learn­ing to be at peace with your own com­pany. And more and more of us want in.

A cul­tural shift?

It’s not hard to see the ap­peal – our search for ways to take the pres­sure off in in­creas­ingly stress­ful times means JOMO is the ideal catch­phrase for a mod­ern era, but why is it now a ‘thing’? With so­cial me­dia giv­ing us a big­ger win­dow into the lives of oth­ers than ever be­fore, the in­sid­i­ous fear of miss­ing out has in turn reached new heights. Some believe our FOMO was first trig­gered by the ten­dency for West­ern­ised cul­ture to favour

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