Hawke's Bay Today

MAN ADMITS MACHETE ATTACK

Fox terriers’ illness thought due to eating baits at orchards

- Sahiban Hyde Jo Linton

AHastings orchardist whose two dogs ate poison while off-leash says orchards should have to do leaflet drops in semi-rural neighbourh­oods when undertakin­g pest control.

Jo Linton told Hawke’s Bay Today she had taken her two fox terrier dogs with her to her Longlands Rd workplace for a year.

Both ate poison last week, which she thinks may have been caused by Pindonebai­ted carrots recently placed at nearby orchards.

Linton took her dogs to the vet on Monday when they began vomiting and showing signs of distress.

They were given anti-vomiting injections and pain relief, and the next day both were placed on a drip. They are now recovering.

Linton said while her vet could not confirm if Pindone was the poison, she felt it was “highly coincident­al” timing.

She is now calling for better neighbourh­ood-wide notificati­on when the poison is being used in semi-rural areas such as Longlands Rd.

Pindone is an anticoagul­ant poison that was developed in the early 1940s. It is used worldwide to control rodents, although its use for the control of rats and mice has decreased following the introducti­on of more potent anticoagul­ants such as brodifacou­m.

There are different types of Pindone bait: with a user certificat­e, carrot and pellet bait can be hand-laid on the ground for rabbits.

Pellets can also be dispensed in bait stations for possums, rats and rabbits.

Linton said there was no legislatio­n to say neighbouri­ng properties needed to be notified if Pindone was being used.

“What I am worried about is that if we go into level 3, there are lots of people out here who take their dogs for a walk around the area, and while there might be signs, not everyone would stop to read,”

"The neighbours need to be informed — a small A4 sign is not enough."

Linton said. “The neighbours need to be informed — a small A4 sign is not enough.

“There are three orchards close by that have applied Pindone and neighbouri­ng properties have had no indication that it is being used.

“My question is, who controls the poison staying in one area?

“Pukeko will pick up a bait and can semi-fly, rabbits can leave a poisoned area, hawks may pick up carcasses.

“It seems very unsafe to me in a rural setting with multiple properties whether being horticultu­ral or lifestyle.”

Rural Pest Services Ltd’s owner/manager, Jake Bowcock, whose company recently laid Pindone carrot bait in the area, said that legally they were obliged to put up signage, which they had done.

“We have signage to let people know coming in . . . that rabbits are being baited,” Bowcock said.

“We have had the signs up for 12 months because it is an ongoing rabbitcont­rol operation.”

Bowcock said verbal notificati­on of a Pindone drop was provided to direct neighbours but that Linton’s orchard was “so far away” that she hadn’t been notified.

“It seems unreasonab­le that it [Pindone] has anything to do with it.”

He said anyone putting out poison should put up signage, but not everyone did it.

Linton said signage was not “nearly enough”.

“I am not throwing the blame on anyone, but the public need to be more aware,” she said.

“If I had been aware there was poison bait, I would not have let my dogs wander off.”

Hawke’s Bay Regional Council’s compliance manager, Nick Zaman, said Pindone was approved for use by the Environmen­tal Protection Authority and needed a controlled substance licence from the Ministry for Primary Industries for its use.

“The regional council does not have a role in approving Pindone use on private property,” Zaman said.

“In this case we understand the farm had signage on display for anyone entering the property to inform them that baits were being used.

“This is different in terms of putting signage up warning the public for an activity like spraying where there is a potential for spray drift past the property boundary.

“Baits are laid on a property.”

 ?? PHOTOS / WARREN BUCKLAND ?? Jo Linton with her dogs Yogi (left) and Lilly at work on a Longlands Rd orchard in Hastings.
PHOTOS / WARREN BUCKLAND Jo Linton with her dogs Yogi (left) and Lilly at work on a Longlands Rd orchard in Hastings.
 ??  ?? A Pindone poison warning posted on a St Georges Rd orchard road frontage in Hastings.
A Pindone poison warning posted on a St Georges Rd orchard road frontage in Hastings.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from New Zealand