Manawatu Standard

The Crown’s Rotten plot twist

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The producers of The Crown tried to invent scenes of a rioting crowd pelting the Queen with bottles during her Silver Jubilee procession, John Lydon has claimed.

The former Sex Pistols frontman said he refused to allow God Save the Queen to be used in the Netflix drama after learning how it was to be used.

‘‘It was a very perverse interpreta­tion of the history of the Jubilee,’’ Lydon told the High Court, where he gave evidence as part of a dispute with his former bandmates.

It is the latest accusation of falsehood to hit the show, which has been accused of a series of inventions that portray the Royal family in an unflatteri­ng light.

On June 7 1977, the day of the Jubilee procession, the Sex Pistols staged a publicity stunt to perform God Save the Queen on a boat down the Thames.

Lydon said he was open to the idea of the song being used on The Crown’s soundtrack.

But in his witness statement to court, he said: ‘‘Then it turned into the producers wanting to use actors for a re-enactment of [the] famous boat trip.

‘‘The producers of The Crown wanted to distort the history of the day and depict me as a political protester and to show scenes of protest in front of the Queen in the middle of her Jubilee celebratio­ns. Events that simply did not happen.

‘‘The story that they presented was with the Queen in despair in her carriage, and all those ugly scenes on the streets of crowds fighting and chucking bottles, whilst others were celebratin­g the Queen.

‘‘Nobody was rioting, and here is my real, serious problem with it. ‘‘This never happened. This is a lie about history.

‘‘They can mish-mash history all they want, but they can’t do it using my name,’’ he said.

The episode eventually broadcast showed the Queen in her carriage, with no protests around her.

The Sex Pistols’ guitarist, Steve Jones, and drummer, Paul Cook, are suing Lydon after he refused to allow their songs to be used in a forthcomin­g biopic of the band, called Pistol.

Lydon said it was ‘‘dumbfoundi­ng’’ and ‘‘overwhelmi­ngly rude’’ that he could be portrayed on screen without being consulted. He said Pistol’s director, Danny Boyle, had treated him ‘‘with complete disregard’’.– Telegraph Group

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 ??  ?? John Lydon, also known as Johnny Rotten, drags down a hasty cigarette outside the High Court Rolls Building in London. Lydon was giving evidence in a hearing between two former Sex Pistols band members and the band frontman over the use of their songs in a television series.
John Lydon, also known as Johnny Rotten, drags down a hasty cigarette outside the High Court Rolls Building in London. Lydon was giving evidence in a hearing between two former Sex Pistols band members and the band frontman over the use of their songs in a television series.

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