DO YOUR LATS KEEP YOU FLAT

New Zealand Golf Magazine - - CONTENTS -

Paul Green­wood with help for peo­ple who spend a lot of time sit­ting.

TO END OUR SE­RIES ON HOW SIT­TING CAN AF­FECT YOUR GOLF SWING WE WILL LOOK AT ONE OF THE LARGEST MUS­CLES IN THE BODY AND CER­TAINLY THE BACK, THE LATISSMUS DORSI; AKA THE LATS.

In the last is­sue we dis­cussed how be­ing deskbound can round the shoul­ders and help de­crease the mo­bil­ity of the shoul­der. An­other ram­i­fi­ca­tion of this can be the on the lats which not only be­come weak but can also be­come very tight. To check if your lats have be­come too tight take a look at ‘The Self- Screen’.

Tight lats can have nu­mer­ous im­pli­ca­tions on the golf swing; poor set up, loss of pos­ture through­out the swing as well as dif­fi­cutly get­ting the club over­head. For now we will fo­cus on how tight lats can cause what is known as a ‘hor­i­zon­tal or flat shoul­der plane’ (see Coaches Cor­ner for a de­tailed ex­pla­na­tion). Due to tight­ness in the lats it makes it harder for the golfer to get the club up above their shoul­ders. As a re­sult a com­pen­sa­tion the body can make is for the up­per body to come out of its orig­i­nal spine an­gle at ad­dress (i.e tilted ) dur­ing the back swing and be­come more up­right and hence the shoul­ders are now more par­el­lel to the ground at the top of the swing.

A great stretch you can do in the of­fice or at home to help lengthen the lats is the Wall Lat Stretch (See ‘The Fix’ for how to per­fom). Do­ing this daily not only will help your body’s abil­ity to ro­tate the shoul­ders around the spine more ef­f­i­cently but also will also help over­all pos­ture. How­ever as is the theme over the past few months, the best rem­edy is to re­duce the time you spend sit­ting!!

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