FAB­RIC GLOS­SARY

New Zealand Weddings Planner - - Attire -

BROCADE

This heavy jacquard­wo­ven fab­ric usu­ally con­tains me­tal­lic threads to cre­ate tex­ture and pat­terns.

CHARMEUSE

A light, rich fab­ric that drapes well and has a glossy sheen. It can be made from both silk and syn­thetic fi­bres.

CHIF­FON

Chif­fon is a del­i­cate, trans­par­ent fab­ric made from ei­ther silk or rayon.

CREPE

Made of a light silk or rayon, crepe is a gauzy, crin­kled fab­ric ideal for soft sil­hou­ettes.

DAMASK

Like brocade, damask has de­signs woven into the fab­ric but is a lighter op­tion.

DUCHESSE SATIN

This blend of silk and rayon is a more af­ford­able op­tion than pure silk or satin.

DUPION SILK

This shim­mer­ing, crisp fab­ric is cre­ated by weav­ing two rough silk threads of dif­fer­ent colours to­gether.

LACE

A del­i­cate fab­ric that brings tex­ture to the bridal gown. French Chan­tilly lace sits at the top of the range and is more ex­pen­sive as it’s com­pletely hand­made. Guipure lace is typ­i­cally used for bodices and sleeves.

ORGANZA

A sheer silk or syn­thetic ma­te­rial that’s stiff, but less coarse than tulle.

POLYESTER

This syn­thetic fi­bre can be woven into most fab­rics which will lower the cost.

RAYON

A smooth, man­u­fac­tured fab­ric that has a sim­i­lar look and feel to silk, but is more af­ford­able.

SATIN

Satin is a densely woven silk with a pear­les­cent sheen on one side for a smooth, slinky feel.

SHANTUNG

This heavy fab­ric is made from silk, cot­ton or syn­thetic fi­bres and feels slightly rough to the touch.

SILK

A soft, nat­u­ral fi­bre, silk is one of the most ex­pen­sive fab­rics. Its threads are also used to cre­ate other fab­rics such as satin, shantung, chif­fon and organza.

TAFFETA

This crisp, smooth fab­ric is made from silk or syn­thetic fi­bres and suits a more struc­tured gown.

TULLE

Tulle is of­ten as­so­ci­ated with bal­leri­nas’ tu­tus – the net­ting is made from starched silk, ny­lon or rayon.

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