Flow­ers

For­ag­ing for a florist? Get the best blooms for your bud­get with these ex­pert tips and tricks.

New Zealand Weddings Planner - - Editor’s Letter -

01. CAS­CADE

If you want to make a flo­ral state­ment, you can’t look past an over­flow­ing, cas­cade bou­quet. This bou­quet is ar­ranged into a pretty bunch at your hands, with loosely tied green­ery and flow­ers flow­ing dra­mat­i­cally to­wards the floor.

02. HAND-TIED

Per­haps one of the most pop­u­lar bou­quet styles cur­rently for ca­sual and for­mal wed­dings alike, a hand-tied bou­quet is ar­ranged loosely to look un­struc­tured; styled to seem as if the blooms have just been plucked from a nearby field.

03. POSY

These ar­range­ments are small and dainty enough to be held in one hand. A great op­tion for brides­maids, or for brides who want any easy way to trim some dol­lars from their bud­get – or sim­ply want their wed­ding gown to take cen­tre stage.

04. ROUND

The most tra­di­tional and clas­sic shape to choose from, a round bou­quet usu­ally con­sists of just one or two pretty and wide-bloom­ing flow­ers such as pe­onies or roses, which are then tightly packed to­gether to form a tidy, spher­i­cal bunch.

05. PAGEANT

Also known as the arm sheaf, the pageant bou­quet gen­er­ally con­sists of flow­ers and green­ery with long, slen­der stems ar­ranged to rest in the crook of your arm. Less com­monly used, it’s an­other op­tion for brides who are look­ing to wow.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVOUR?

Plants in all their forms can make great guest favours. Con­sider mini pot­ted suc­cu­lents that could dou­ble as place names, pack­ets of seeds for guests to take home and plant, or even fra­grant herbs that can be put to good use in the kitchen. If you’ve gone all-out on your flo­ral re­cep­tion dé­cor and you’re not sure what to do with the blooms af­ter the event, con­sider hav­ing ar­range­ments bro­ken down to­wards the end of the night, and dis­tribut­ing the fresh flow­ers to guests as they leave, or do­nat­ing them to a lo­cal hospi­tal or rest home.

PICK OF THE BUNCH The end­less list of flow­ers you can choose from aside, what about the dif­fer­ent bou­quets? Here’s a quick run-down.

01. WHAT’S YOUR BUD­GET?

This is one of the most im­por­tant things you should try and pin­point be­fore talk­ing to po­ten­tial florists. Most florists are more than happy to de­sign flower ar­range­ments within any bud­get, no mat­ter how small, but a de­fin­i­tive guide­line will help them know what they have to work with from the get-go.

02. RE­SEARCH DIF­FER­ENT FLO­RAL PROS

Just like pho­tog­ra­phers, most florists will have their own unique style and taste. Do a bit of re­search on dif­fer­ent florists and their styles through their web­site or In­sta­gram, or re­quest to see their port­fo­lio. This will help en­sure you’ll be happy with your flo­rals come wed­ding day.

03. WHAT IDEAS DO YOU HAVE AL­READY?

Do you have a theme, colour pal­ette or style in mind for your day yet? All these el­e­ments can help your florist cre­ate blooms that work co­he­sively with the rest of your wed­ding day styling. Come equipped with any pic­tures, mag­a­zine clip­pings or Pin­ter­est boards that you love.

04. IS YOUR WED­DING DATE AVAIL­ABLE?

While this may seem like an ob­vi­ous thing to con­sider, florists can be booked up to a year in ad­vance – and in some cases more than that – so if you have some­one in mind, it’s best to bite the bul­let and book as soon as you can to avoid dis­ap­point­ment later down the track.

05. HAS THE FLORIST WORKED AT YOUR VENUE?

While def­i­nitely not a deal­breaker, if a florist is fa­mil­iar with your wed­ding venue, they’ll have a bet­ter idea of what will work and look great in the space. If they haven’t, con­sider ask­ing your venue op­er­a­tor for pho­tos of other cou­ples’ set-ups to see if you can glean any bright ideas.

FIVE THINGS TO CON­SIDER BE­FORE BOOK­ING YOUR FLORIST

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