Ed­i­ble in­sects to ath­leisure… What’s trend­ing in well­ness

Ed­i­ble in­sects, ac­tivewear in the of­fice and nap­ping for ex­er­cise… They’re just some of the many trends set to be mak­ing their way onto the health scene this year. We take a closer look

NEXT (New Zealand) - - Contents - BY MONIQUE McKEN­ZIE

Move over turmeric lat­tes – cha­gac­ci­nos will be your next go-to get­ting you through the morn­ing rush. We’re de­cod­ing the weird and won­der­ful trends tak­ing the well­ness world by storm, from the lat­est in­ter­ac­tive fit­ness trend to why ‘doga’ is the next big thing.

Health

1 NOOTROPICS

There are cur­rently few proven brain­power boost­ers, but that’s set to change thanks to a new sup­ple­ment from In­dia. Nootropics are nat­u­rally de­rived drugs that help cog­ni­tive func­tion as they con­tain mem­ory-en­hanc­ing and brain­cell pro­tect­ing com­pounds found in herbs such as ash­wa­gandha. Nootropics in­clude amino acids such as choline and ty­ro­sine which help sup­port the ner­vous sys­tem and re­duce men­tal stress. You can buy them in a tablet form con­tain­ing B vi­ta­mins and omega-3, help­ing pro­tect the cen­tral ner­vous sys­tem from age­ing.

2 ADAPTOGENS

Long cel­e­brated in Chi­nese and Ayurvedic medicine, adaptogens are plants and herbs that are said to mod­u­late the body’s stress re­sponses – and are now of­fered as vi­ta­min sup­ple­ments. Dubbed ‘stressed-out plants for stressed-out peo­ple’, adaptogens nor­malise hor­mones and prom­ise sleep and anti-age­ing ben­e­fits. Maca root is one adap­to­gen that is in­creas­ingly pop­u­lar, of­ten sold in pow­der form to add to drinks. Try an adap­to­gen shot, or blend a su­per­food and adap­to­gen pow­der with nut milk for an en­ergy-boost­ing latte.

3 CANNABID­IOL

A com­pound of mar­i­juana, cannabid­iol is proven to re­duce anx­i­ety and stress, lower in­flam­ma­tion and ease de­pres­sion, PMS and in­som­nia symp­toms – with­out the high. La­belled as the new co­conut oil, cannabid­iol is be­ing in­fused into skin­care prod­ucts and tinc­ture sup­ple­ments as a way of get­ting the ac­tive in­gre­di­ent into our bod­ies, al­though re­search is still be­ing done to fully un­der­stand its ben­e­fits.

DUBBED THE NEW CO­CONUT OIL, CANNABID­IOL IS BE­ING IN­FUSED INTO

SKIN­CARE PROD­UCTS

Life­style

1 ATH­LEISURE

As we in­creas­ingly blend well­ness into the work­ing day with stand­ing desks, walk­ing meet­ings and run­ning clubs in our lunch break, we need a mul­tipur­pose wardrobe that can take us from the board­room to box­ing class. Think tech­ni­cal fab­rics, tai­lored sweat­shirts and luxe back­packs.

2 DOGA

Down­ward dog, any­one? Dog yoga – oth­er­wise known as ‘doga’ – isn’t only good for work­ing on your war­rior pose, it pro­motes bond­ing with your four­legged friend, too. Of course your pooch won’t be able to mas­ter the poses, but they will ben­e­fit from stretch­ing, light mas­sage and the calm­ing en­vi­ron­ment.

3 CHAGA MUSH­ROOMS

For those of you who aren’t yet drink­ing cha­gac­ci­nos, take note – they’re the new turmeric latte. This Siberian birch tree par­a­site is a nu­tri­ent­packed in­gre­di­ent. Like other medic­i­nal mush­rooms, chaga con­tains po­tent polysac­cha­rides known for their im­mune­sup­port­ing prop­er­ties. Chaga is also high in an­tiox­i­dants and is a pow­er­ful an­ti­age­ing and anti-vi­ral tonic. It can be used in pow­der form in recipes, or used in place of a teabag or cof­fee gran­ules.

AS WE IN­CREAS­INGLY BLEND WELL­NESS

INTO THE WORK­ING DAY,

WE NEED A MUL­TIPUR­POSE

WARDROBE

Find­ing pur­pose

1 START­ING YOUR OWN BUSI­NESS

Ever dreamed of start­ing your own well­ness brand or busi­ness? Make this your mo­ment and turn your mo­ti­va­tions into a re­al­ity. Re­mem­ber these three key steps – seed, by re­fin­ing your idea; have a strat­egy, by plan­ning ahead – with a busi­ness coach, if need be; and scale, by set­ting your new busi­ness on the path to suc­cess.

2 BE­ING SELFISH

We’ve been all about show­ing kind­ness and com­pas­sion to­wards oth­ers, but the fo­cus now is get­ting in touch with your in­ner nasty gal, as demon­strated in this Ja­panese self-help trend. Sound heavy? More than three mil­lion copies of The Courage To Be Dis­liked by Ichiro Kishimi have been sold glob­ally. But don’t ex­pect a self-help book filled with pos­i­tive af­fir­ma­tions – chap­ters cover how not to get sucked into do­ing tasks for oth­ers and how to shake off feel­ing in­fe­rior. The idea is that free­dom is be­ing dis­liked by other peo­ple, as it’s proof you’re liv­ing in ac­cor­dance with your own prin­ci­ples, and that it’s not nec­es­sary to sat­isfy other peo­ple’s ex­pec­ta­tions. You Do You (A No F**ks Given Guide) by Sarah Knight is based on sim­i­lar self-help prin­ci­ples.

3 GET­TING TO KNOW YOUR TIME TRIBE

Don’t feel guilty sip­ping your morn­ing cof­fee in a daze while your col­league is bright-eyed and bushy-tailed. They’re not nec­es­sar­ily more pro­duc­tive than you – you sim­ply be­long to dif­fer­ent time tribes. We all have a chrono­type or cir­ca­dian rhythm, which in­flu­ences when we are in a bet­ter mood and at our an­a­lyt­i­cal best. Your chrono­type is the mid­point be­tween when you go to bed and would get up if you had no re­spon­si­bil­i­ties to­mor­row. If it’s ear­lier than 3.30am, you’re a Lark, later than 5.30am an Owl, and if it’s be­tween 3.30am and 5.30am you’re a Third-bird. Re­searchers have dis­cov­ered that gen­er­ally Twit­ter users’ lan­guage is en­gaged and hope­ful in the morn­ing, nose­dives in the af­ter­noon and be­comes more pos­i­tive in the evening. This is be­cause most of us are Larks and Third­birds. And hav­ing a part­ner with a dif­fer­ent chrono­type can cause prob­lems un­less you make al­lowances for each other’s time tribes. Men are sta­tis­ti­cally likely to be owlier than women, mean­ing your brain­power peaks will rarely over­lap. So when hav­ing a con­ver­sa­tion with your Owl part­ner at 6.30am, bear in mind he re­ally isn’t at his lis­ten­ing best. Like­wise, teenagers are likely to be owlier than you, so be pa­tient in the morn­ings to avoid melt­downs.

Par­ent­ing

1 SELF-RE­LIANT KIDS

Take a break from he­li­copter par­ent­ing and read Ach­tung Baby: The Ger­man Art of Rais­ing Self-Re­liant Chil­dren by Sara Zaske. The Ger­man par­ent­ing style is all about giv­ing kids con­fi­dence. The book takes in­spi­ra­tion from Ber­lin, where youngsters ride the un­der­ground alone, play out­doors un­su­per­vised and use sharp knives dur­ing meals from a young age. Ger­man par­ents be­lieve in­de­pen­dence is good for kids; that han­dling risk is a key part of grow­ing up. It’s part of the cul­tural value of selb­ständigkeit, or self-re­liance. The con­cept en­cour­ages adults to rarely in­ter­fere in chil­dren’s play, not even fights, with the pref­er­ence that they should let kids work it out them­selves.

2 SNOOZE-ERCISE

Our kids get nap time, so why shouldn’t we? At Naper­cise class, you sign up for 45-minute stu­dio sleep ses­sions, ex­cel­lent for ex­er­cise-phobes, the over­tired or in­som­niac par­ents who want to lower their blood pres­sure and stress lev­els.

3 THE SLEEP GAD­GET

Thanks to a plethora of apps like Sleep Cy­cle and gad­gets like Fit­bit, many of us mon­i­tor our ac­tiv­ity while in the land of nod. But while these tools tell us the qual­ity of our sleep is poor, it’s hard to know how you can im­prove mat­ters, which is es­pe­cially im­por­tant for tired par­ents. Now a gad­get from China called the Sleep­ace emits nat­u­ral red light, which helps re­lease sleep hor­mone mela­tonin, and fragrances such as jas­mine. Sleep­ace op­er­ates via a silent fan to help you get to sleep and wake in the morn­ing. It tracks your bed­time habits, even mon­i­tor­ing light lev­els in the room.

THE CON­CEPT EN­COUR­AGES ADULTS TO RARELY IN­TER­FERE IN CHIL­DREN’S PLAY, NOT EVEN FIGHTS

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