Northern Outlook

Protecting, nurturing your wairua

- TE AORANGI-KOWHAI MORINI (TATI)

TE WHARE TAPA WHĀ – TAHA WAIRUA OPINION:

In the first article of this series, I introduced to you all the concept of Te Whare Tapa Whā. I also spoke about our taha hinengaro (mental wellbeing) and what that may look like for different people. In this column, we’re talking about taha wairua.

In Te Ao Māori, wairua is our spirit or energy and the way we perceive spirituali­ty. Some may view wairua as a higher being or god that takes care of us and guides us.

However, others may simply view wairua as a sense of being connected to everything around us.

Many believe wairua resides in our heart or mind while others believe it is part of our whole being and is not located in any particular part of the body. No matter how you may view the concept of wairua, it is important to implement practices in your life that protect your wairua and nurture this side of your Te Whare Tapa

Whā.

Personally, I do karakia every day to take care of my wairua and ground myself. Karakia is a form of prayer – through karakia we can either damage our wairua or protect our wairua from harm. So it is important that we do not take advantage of the way we use karakia in our life.

However, there are many ways we can nurture this taha (wall) of our whare (house). Some may go into the ngahere (forest) or rest by the moana (ocean) as a way of connecting to the taiao (environmen­t) around us. I like to go back to my homestead and simply have a cup of tea with my nan or, as she would say, a ‘‘cuppa convo’’.

It’s all about finding the

Neighbourl­y is a 100 per cent Kiwi-owned community platform that helps the neighbourh­oods of Aotearoa thrive. By exchanging helpful informatio­n, goods and services in a safe and trusted way, it's never been easier to feel part of the neighbourh­ood. Join today at neighbourl­y.co.nz

simple things that fill your cup.

Over time, I found out that it was hard for me to constantly give to others when my cup was empty. That’s why I found it important to find time every day to connect with this taha, to do things that make you feel free and boundless, that fill your soul and make your heart smile. This way we don’t burn ourselves out and become drained.

It could be a walk in the park, a quick trip back home, praying before bed or even just finding a quiet space to read your favourite book. Whatever makes your soul feel good is ultimately how we nurture our taha wairua.

 ?? ?? In Te Ao Māori, wairua is our spirit or energy and the way we perceive spirituali­ty, says Te Aorangi-Kowhai Morini (Tati), front, centre.
In Te Ao Māori, wairua is our spirit or energy and the way we perceive spirituali­ty, says Te Aorangi-Kowhai Morini (Tati), front, centre.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from New Zealand