FIND­ING THE PATH TO OP­POR­TU­NITY

NZ Business - - CONTENTS - Jane McCar­roll is the head of mar­ket­ing and mem­ber­ship at IMNZ, the In­sti­tute of Man­age­ment NZ. Help­ing lead­ers step a up and lead since 1946.

A 2018 LinkedIn re­port on tal­ent devel­op­ment has found that the num­ber one pri­or­ity is train­ing for soft skills. In the age of au­to­ma­tion, main­tain­ing tech­ni­cal flu­ency across roles will be crit­i­cal, but the pace of change is fu­elling de­mand for adapt­able, crit­i­cal thinkers, com­mu­ni­ca­tors, and lead­ers. Jane McCar­roll high­lights some key trends in the re­port.

A 2018 LinkedIn re­port on tal­ent devel­op­ment has found that the num­ber one pri­or­ity is train­ing for soft skills. In the age of au­to­ma­tion, main­tain­ing tech­ni­cal flu­ency across roles will be crit­i­cal, but the pace of change is fu­elling de­mand for adapt­able, crit­i­cal thinkers, com­mu­ni­ca­tors, and lead­ers. Jane McCar­roll high­lights some key trends in the re­port.

Ear­lier this year LinkedIn Learn­ing pub­lished the 2018 Work­place Learn­ing Re­port, which sur­veyed more than 4,000 pro­fes­sion­als: 1,200 tal­ent devel­op­ment pro­fes­sion­als, 2,200 em­ploy­ees, 200 ex­ec­u­tives and 400 peo­ple man­agers.

The find­ings showed that tal­ent de­vel­op­ers are in­creas­ingly be­ing asked to play a cen­tral role in strate­gic work­force plan­ning. Through in­ter­views with in­dus­try ex­perts, the re­port also de­tails a more holis­tic view of mod­ern work­place learn­ing, and the chal­lenges that HR pro­fes­sion­als face in to­day’s ever-chang­ing world of work.

Here are some of the key find­ings high­lighted by LinkedIn com­mu­ni­ca­tions team:

1. As the shelf life of skills shrinks, busi­ness lead­ers worry that tal­ent de­vel­op­ers are fo­cused on train­ing for to­day’s skill de­mands, at the ex­pense of pre­vent­ing to­mor­row’s skill gaps. The LinkedIn re­search shows that in 2018, tal­ent de­vel­op­ers are pri­ori­tis­ing the em­ployee devel­op­ment needs of to­day. Yet, ex­ec­u­tives and peo­ple man­agers say that tal­ent devel­op­ment lead­ers should pri­ori­tise iden­ti­fy­ing the skills that will be most im­por­tant to build for the fu­ture. LinkedIn says that savvy tal­ent devel­op­ment lead­ers will find balance in their ef­forts to sup­port the em­ploy­ees of to­day and to­mor­row.

2. The num­ber-one train­ing pri­or­ity in 2018 is soft skills. Each group in the sur­vey – from ex­ec­u­tives to man­agers to tal­ent de­vel­op­ers – iden­ti­fied ‘train­ing for soft skills’ as the num­ber-one pri­or­ity for tal­ent devel­op­ment in 2018. In the age of au­to­ma­tion, main­tain­ing tech­ni­cal flu­ency across roles will be crit­i­cal, but the pace of change is fu­el­ing de­mand for adapt­able em­ploy­ees who are crit­i­cal thinkers, com­mu­ni­ca­tors and lead­ers.

3. Tal­ent de­vel­op­ers are de­pend­ing more on on­line learn­ing so­lu­tions to meet the needs of an in­creas­ingly di­verse, multi-gen­er­a­tional work­force – and there’s no turn­ing back. Fifty-eight per­cent of em­ploy­ees pre­fer op­por­tu­ni­ties to learn at their own pace, 49 per­cent pre­fer to learn at the point of need. Tal­ent de­vel­op­ers know that they need to rely on dig­i­tal learn­ing so­lu­tions to cater to varied learn­ing needs. A re­cent ATD re­port found that al­most 90 per­cent of com­pa­nies of­fer dig­i­tal learn­ing to­day. LinkedIn says its sur­vey shows that tal­ent de­vel­op­ers de­pend more on on­line learn­ing so­lu­tions than ever be­fore – not only to de­liver con­tent, but to mea­sure learn­ing suc­cess.

4. Em­ploy­ers should meet em­ploy­ees on plat­forms they are al­ready us­ing to align their on-the-job needs and pro­fes­sional as­pi­ra­tions. Each group in the sur­vey iden­ti­fied ‘get­ting em­ploy­ees to make time for learn­ing’ as the num­ber-one chal­lenge fac­ing tal­ent devel­op­ment in 2018. Yet, 94 per­cent of em­ploy­ees say that they would stay at a com­pany longer if it in­vested in their ca­reer devel­op­ment. The mod­ern or­gan­i­sa­tion needs to meet learn­ers where they al­ready are – align­ing devel­op­ment op­por­tu­ni­ties with em­ployee as­pi­ra­tions, and en­gag­ing them through the plat­forms where they are al­ready spend­ing their time.

5. Man­ager in­volve­ment is a crit­i­cal in­gre­di­ent to in­crease em­ployee en­gage­ment with learn­ing. LinkedIn says that 56 per­cent of em­ploy­ees say that they would spend more time learn­ing if their man­ager di­rected them to com­plete a spe­cific course in or­der to gain or im­prove their skills. Tal­ent de­vel­op­ers name “in­creased man­ager in­volve­ment” as the num­ber-two chal­lenge they face. Get­ting man­agers more in­volved in em­ployee learn­ing is not the only way to see in­creased learner en­gage­ment, but data shows it will likely make an im­pact. For ex­am­ple, 56 per­cent of em­ploy­ees said they would spend more time learn­ing if their man­ager rec­om­mended cour­ses to them.

You can see the full LinkedIn re­port on https://learn­ing.linkedin.com/elearn­ing-so­lu­tions-guides/ work­place-learn­ing-re­port-2018

At IMNZ we know the world of work is chang­ing – and some jobs are chang­ing faster than oth­ers. While we might not know what they all look like yet – we do know what the skills look like to shep­herd our or­gan­i­sa­tions to be pos­i­tively poised for the fu­ture. It’s stuff the ro­bots can’t do and we can.

"Tal­ent de­vel­op­ers name “in­creased man­ager in­volve­ment” as the num­ber-two chal­lenge they face. Get­ting man­agers more in­volved in em­ployee learn­ing is not the only way to see in­creased learner en­gage­ment, but data shows it will likely make an im­pact."

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