Stun­ning ways to gen­er­ate sales

A THREE-PART MINI-SE­RIES TO HELP YOU GEN­ER­ATE SALES THROUGH SMART TECH­NOL­OGY AND STUN­NING PRE­SEN­TA­TIONS – IN­TRO­DUCED BY GREG EL­LIS FROM CREATIVE SALES AGENCY STUN – SPE­CIAL­ISTS IN WIN­NING PRE­SEN­TA­TIONS.

NZ Business - - COVER STORY -

PART 2: WHY DY­NAMIC PRE­SEN­TA­TIONS ARE GOOD FOR YOUR PER­SONAL BRAND.

It’s true that peo­ple judge oth­ers based on first im­pres­sions, and that, says STUN’s Greg El­lis, is why it’s so im­por­tant to get pre­sen­ta­tion per­for­mances right. “Pre­sen­ta­tions are of­ten a first im­pres­sion, or they’re peo­ple see­ing us in a new way. An im­pres­sion that you form from meet­ing some­one one-on-one can be en­hanced, or un­done, by see­ing how they present to a group,” he says.

“Re­mem­ber; your slides are up be­hind you while you’re talk­ing. Even if you are great, a dated or poorly de­signed pre­sen­ta­tion re­ally un­der­cuts your mes­sage.”

His ad­vice is to get help to cre­ate your pre­sen­ta­tions, which is STUN’s area of ex­per­tise.

“That doesn’t mean leave it all to us,” he ex­plains, “You need to be in­volved in the ini­tial brief­ing and the work on the story if you’re giv­ing the pre­sen­ta­tion.

“Then once you have the words pre­pared – prac­tice it with one or two peo­ple you trust to give you ob­jec­tive feed­back. Don’t wing it. It al­ways shows.”

FAST-FOOD OR FINE DIN­ING?

El­lis has seen some bad pre­sen­ta­tions in his time – even from lead­ers of large or­gan­i­sa­tions.

One of the rea­sons is lack of in­volve­ment in the pre­sen­ta­tion’s prepa­ra­tion.

“The num­ber of times I’ve heard some­one ad­mit they don’t know what’s on the pre­sen­ta­tion be­cause some­one else pre­pared it. It’s shock­ing. It makes you look am­a­teur and tells the au­di­ence they aren’t im­por­tant enough for you to pre­pare for.

“On the other hand, a well-de­signed pre­sen­ta­tion that looks good and has a great story, tells peo­ple that the mes­sage is im­por­tant; it’s been care­fully pre­pared specif­i­cally for them, and they are ex­actly the peo­ple that need to hear it be­cause it’s im­por­tant to them.”

El­lis likens it to the dif­fer­ence be­tween eat­ing at a fast-food joint or fine din­ing restau­rant. “In one the food’s usu­ally pre­pared with­out any care and you’re a num­ber – that’s a sloppy pre­sen­ta­tion.

“But when you know peo­ple have taken care, you’ll feel great about your­self and the restau­rant!”

THE EMO­TIONAL CON­NEC­TION

Emo­tion­ally con­nect­ing with the au­di­ence is cru­cial be­cause hu­mans re­spond to emo­tion.

“We pick up on the emo­tions of oth­ers be­cause that gives us a guide to the sit­u­a­tion we find our­selves in. If they are scared or ner­vous, we feel scared or ner­vous; if they’re dis­en­gaged, so are we. But if they are pas­sion­ate and con­fi­dent, we also feel that way,” ex­plains El­lis.

“You cre­ate an emo­tional con­nec­tion through your at­ti­tude and by hav­ing a story. The story needs to hook peo­ple in. They need to feel for the char­ac­ters and the sit­u­a­tions they find them­selves in be­cause you care about them.

“You don’t iden­tify with num­bers, you con­nect with what those num­bers mean for peo­ple. Think about the movies and TV shows you love. They have strong sto­ries that you re­act to. The same struc­tures and tech­niques they use are univer­sal and can be ap­plied to any pre­sen­ta­tion.”

En­gag­ing pro­fes­sion­als to help with your pre­sen­ta­tion is im­por­tant, but be in­volved with the process and prac­tice be­fore­hand.

Check out the venue prior to pre­sent­ing, El­lis ad­vises. Sit­ting in on prior pre­sen­ta­tions also helps, as does know­ing the mood of the au­di­ence. “Even if it’s hos­tile!”

And en­sure the most knowl­edge­able and pas­sion­ate per­son in your or­ga­ni­za­tion gets the op­por­tu­nity to present. Of­ten pre­sen­ters are cho­sen be­cause of se­nior­ity but it can be bet­ter to let some­one else do it for you.

“That re­flects on you re­ally well as a leader; when you have a fan­tas­tic team that steps up and knocks it out of the park!”

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