TAG TEAM

Low cost, do-it-your­self plant mark­ers are a quick way to add a lit­tle cre­ativ­ity to your gar­den

NZ House & Garden - Country Living - - Backyard Playgrounds Finishing Touches -

La­bels are a wise idea if you have trou­ble iden­ti­fy­ing plants, are sav­ing seeds, have other peo­ple who will be do­ing the pick­ing, or you want to avoid los­ing your bulbs each year. But as well as their prac­ti­cal uses, la­bels can sim­ply make your plot pret­tier.

1

These light­weight cop­per tags have been la­belled us­ing steel stamps but a reg­u­lar ball­point will do the same job of per­ma­nently en­grav­ing the metal. The words will never wash off and the cop­per will weather to an at­trac­tive green patina.

2

If

you’ve got a steady hand, you could at­tempt these with a paint­brush. Oth­er­wise, buy your­self a white paint pen or grease pen­cil (from a craft store), grab some flat-sided rocks and this la­belling job will be done in a jiffy.

3

Slate

isn’t a com­monly avail­able ma­te­rial (un­less you work for a spe­cial­ist roof­ing com­pany) but if you can get your hands on some - or find tags at a gar­den shop - write on them with white paint or grease pen­cil rather than chalk, which will wash right off in the first shower. Sim­i­lar-look­ing tags could be made us­ing wooden tags painted with black chalk­board paint.

4

Stamp

let­ters on the side of wooden clothes pegs us­ing a per­ma­nent ink such as Sta­zon, then clip onto small stakes.

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