It out to en­sure team comes first

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‘ As a coach it’s im­por­tant you treat them no dif­fer­ently to other play­ers.’ GRA­HAM HENRY

through their sport­ing lives.

‘‘It’s that quiet com­pet­i­tive­ness. We don’t talk about it, but I can as­sure you when we were play­ing back­yard footy and cricket there was plenty of that go­ing on.’’

Since the first All Black test match in 1903, there have been 46 sets of sib­lings to don the black jersey.

How­ever, only 12 of those were named to start to­gether, in 121 tests. Of those games with broth­ers start­ing, the All Blacks won 72 per cent. Games played with­out broth­ers fea­tured in the run-on side saw a greater win rate: 79 per cent.

Former All Blacks coach Gra­ham Henry agreed with the re­search: if there are sib­lings in a team they need to be treated as an in­di­vid­ual to get the best re­sults.

Henry coached the All Blacks from 2004 to 2011, when first Ben and Owen Franks, and George and Sam White­lock played to­gether.

‘‘Ob­vi­ously they are very sup­port­ive of each other and un­der­stand each oth­ers play, but as a coach it’s im­por­tant you treat them no dif­fer­ently to other play­ers,’’ Henry said.

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