Thanks for writ­ing

The Northland Age - - Opinion -

A big thank you for send­ing in your mon­eysav­ing tips. Your sug­ges­tions are a great sup­port to those who need to tighten their belts to make ends meet or are sav­ing to make to­mor­row bet­ter.

Caro wrote: “I live in Auck­land, and around this area there is the ‘Free Cy­cle’ web­site that peo­ple can join, where ev­ery­thing is free. The Neighbourl­y web­site also has free stuff and wanted free stuff. There are re­cy­cling de­pots around Auck­land, where you can now go to get cheap items. I hate see­ing rub­bish dumped on the road­side when the Auck­land Coun­cil has a re­cy­cling site.”

She also has some no-non­sense com­ments about man­ag­ing money: “Peo­ple spend too much on vices. They do not know how to bud­get. All these agen­cies are hand­ing out lunches, rain­coats, shoes, break­fasts, etc, when other peo­ple are look­ing af­ter their chil­dren. Stop some of it and make peo­ple bud­get for the ne­ces­si­ties. Every state house around where I live has a Sky dish, and flash cars parked in the drive­way. I own my own home, have one in­come, and can­not af­ford Sky. Why can they? Be­cause their chil­dren are be­ing pro­vided all the free stuff be­cause they scream poverty.

“Grow a veg­etable gar­den, bud­get hard and be money-smart — it is not hard. I brought up three strap­ping lads on my own with no help. I cooked, grew veg­eta­bles, shopped savvy at the mar­kets, never ever had hand­outs for any­thing — and they have gone on to places, as did I.”

Bill tells a story about a chap who was only able to work part-time be­cause he did not have trans­port to get to work. “He spent what­ever money was in his pocket — what­ever his kids wanted, they got, un­til the money ran out. So his boss had a chat to him and they agreed that he would hold back some­thing from every pay and put it into a sav­ings ac­count. Within a few months there was enough put aside to buy a car, and he was then able to get full­time em­ploy­ment.”

Essie (Auck­land): “To save money, and for health, I dig up, wash and dry a few dan­de­lion roots when they get in the way in the gar­den. When us­ing the oven for some­thing else, I pop the roots in for about 10 min­utes to get them to a dark brown colour (never burnt). Cool, and store in the fridge in a jar. When I want to spin out my morn­ing cof­fee, I take about two ta­ble­spoons of dan­de­lion root and a dozen cof­fee beans, and grind them up to­gether for a nu­tri­tious, in­ex­pen­sive cuppa . . . the dan­de­lion is good for the liver.”

Essie has this tip about us­ing lo­quat seeds: “I steam (or boil) the big seeds un­til ed­i­ble. They can be ground up and used in mak­ing al­mond bis­cuits with a lit­tle al­mond essence. A Tai­wanese lady told me lo­quat leaves are a tonic — they pick a cou­ple, leave them to dry in the house, then crunch them into a fine pow­der and steep in boil­ing wa­ter be­fore drink­ing as a tea.”

(Some say the seeds are poi­sonous, so check be­fore us­ing.)

"To save money, and for health, I dig up, wash and dry a few dan­de­lion roots when they get in the way in the gar­den. When us­ing the oven for some­thing else, I pop the roots in for about 10 min­utes to get them to a dark brown colour (never burnt). Cool, and store in the fridge in a jar."

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