The Post

Three ways with . . . salmon

Salmon’s everywhere these days, but the trick to cooking it well is to buy the best you can, writes

- TERIYAKI SALMON WITH ORANGE AND WATERCRESS RAW SALMON WITH OUZO AND LEMON DIY SOUS VIDE SALMON For more of Lucy’s recipes, visit kitchen-maid.blogspot.co.nz

REMEMBER when salmon was a luxury? It used to seem so fancy, restricted to restaurant menus and special occasions. Now it’s just about ubiquitous, available everywhere and in everything.

That’s no bad thing, but it does somehow make it invisible despite its orangey-pink glow. The trick to cooking good salmon at home is to buy the best you can – and make it a treat. Here’s how. Serves 4 as a main course Preparatio­n: 10 minutes Cooking: 6 minutes This is fancy enough to make when people come for dinner, but not so fancy that you should save it just for special occasions. Remember that the salmon will continue to cook after it comes off the heat, so don’t be tempted to overcook it. 4 x 120-150g salmon fillets 4 tablespoon­s teriyaki sauce (I use

(Kikkoman) 2 tablespoon­s dry mustard powder 1 teaspoon Chinese five-spice

powder 2 tablespoon­s caster sugar zest and juice of 1 orange 4 handfuls (about 100g)

watercress Put the salmon fillets in a large bowl and pour over the teriyaki sauce, turning the fillets so they are coated on both sides.

Mix the mustard powder, sugar, and five-spice powder in a shallow bowl.

Divide the watercress among four dinner plates.

Heat a couple of tablespoon­s of oil in a large, heavy frying pan. Drain the teriyaki sauce from the salmon fillets, then coat each one in the mustard and sugar mixture.

Cook the salmon for about 3 minutes on the first side, then flip over carefully and cook for another 2 to 3 minutes.

Remove the pan from the heat, then put a piece of salmon on top of the watercress on each plate.

Squeeze a little orange juice over the salmon.

Scatter over a little of the orange zest, then serve. Serves 2-3 as a starter Preparatio­n: 5 minutes, plus

2 hours’ chilling time We’ve become very fond of ouzo in our house, to cook with and to drink (yes, really). Even if the thought of drinking it makes your eyes water, try it this way. 250 piece of salmon, pin-boned 3 tablespoon­s ouzo (I like the

Metaxa brand) 1 teaspoon flaky sea salt finely grated zest of 1 lemon 1 tablespoon finely chopped dill or

fennel fronds Line a large, flat dish with baking paper.

Slice the salmon very thinly (use your sharpest knife and a steady hand) across the grain.

Lay each slice out flat on the baking paper in a single layer.

Sprinkle over the salt, then drizzle over the ouzo.

Cover tightly with plastic wrap, then refrigerat­e for 2 hours. Serves 2 Preparatio­n: 5 minutes Cooking: 2-5 minutes There’s no need for any fancy kitchen kit here, just a plastic sandwich bag and a kettle.

This is a truly no-mess, no-smell way to cook salmon tail fillets, which are often on the skinny side. Plus, it’s a great method for first-time cooks, because you can peep through the plastic to see how the salmon changes colour. 2 x 120g salmon tail fillets 1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil flaky sea salt and cracked black

pepper Set the kettle to boil. Drizzle the olive oil over the salmon fillets, and sprinkle generously with salt and pepper.

Put the salmon into a zip-lock sandwich bag and smooth out as much of the air as you can before sealing tightly.

Half fill a heatproof bowl with the just-boiled water, then add the bag of salmon.

You may need to weight it down with a spoon to keep it under the water level.

The salmon will take 2 to 5 minutes to cook, depending on its thickness.

When it’s done to your liking, take it out of the plastic and serve.

 ?? Photo: DAVID WHITE/FAIRFAX NZ ?? When you’re ready to serve, drain the ouzo off the salmon and rearrange it on a serving platter.
Sprinkle over the lemon zest and dill or fennel, and serve.
Even if the thought of drinking ouzo makes your eyes water, do
try it drizzled on salmon.
Photo: DAVID WHITE/FAIRFAX NZ When you’re ready to serve, drain the ouzo off the salmon and rearrange it on a serving platter. Sprinkle over the lemon zest and dill or fennel, and serve. Even if the thought of drinking ouzo makes your eyes water, do try it drizzled on salmon.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from New Zealand