Colour­ful celosia no-fuss bor­der plant

Waihi Leader - - News - By HENRI HAM

Awa­puni Nurs­eries

If you want a lively in­jec­tion of colour into your gar­den this sum­mer, look no fur­ther than celosia. Celosia has bright flow­ers that make at­trac­tive gar­den bor­ders, and also lovely cut ar­range­ments.

With its flame-like heads, celosia looks like lit­tle balls of fire in the gar­den. It’s a small an­nual, that grows to around 30cm tall. Large waxy green leaves frame celosia’s spec­tac­u­lar flow­ers, which bloom in vi­brant yel­low, or­ange and reds.

What I like about celosia is that it looks amaz­ing (like a field of fire) when planted en masse. Also, it’s a re­ally easy flower to plant and re­quires min­i­mal care.

If your gar­den is al­ready short of gar­den space, celosia also looks very pretty in pots. Tech­ni­cally celosia is an an­nual (mean­ing they’ll only last one sea­son), but it can sur­vive more than one sea­son if grown in a warmer cli­mate. Bring your pots in­side when it starts to cool off, and you may be re­warded again next spring.

At Awa­puni Nurs­eries we have two types of celosia seedlings to choose from. The cockscomb va­ri­ety gets its name be­cause its flow­ers look like the head of a rooster. Its blooms are rather stiff and waxy and they last longer than most flow­ers — both on the plant and in a vase.

Their firm­ness also makes them great can­di­dates for dried flow­ers or for a bou­quet. And the stems on a celosia are the same colour as the bloom, which

The cockscomb va­ri­ety gets its name be­cause its flow­ers look like the head of a rooster. Its blooms are rather stiff and waxy and they last longer than most flow­ers — both on the plant and in a vase.’

makes for a vis­ual treat.

Ki­mono mix is the sec­ond va­ri­ety of celosia avail­able — and brand-new to the nurs­ery this sea­son. Its flow­ers are bright and truly do look like lit­tle balls of fire in your gar­den, with feather-shaped petals.

You can grab your celosia seedlings from the Awa­puni Nurs­eries on­line shop and have them de­liv­ered di­rect to your door. We guar­an­tee sat­is­fac­tion, and if you’re not com­pletely happy with your plants we will re­place them.

To plant them, first find a sunny well-drained spot in the gar­den. Dig in some good gen­eral fer­tiliser to give your plants the best pos­si­ble start. Plant the seedlings in holes 3cm deep, about 20cm apart. Give them a good ini­tial wa­ter­ing, and then af­ter­wards wa­ter ev­ery few days.

I rec­om­mend plant­ing them with other an­nu­als such as marigolds, zin­nias and asters, for some fun coloured va­ri­ety in your flower gar­den.

Celosia is fairly drought re­sis­tant, so if you head away over sum­mer for a few days, your plants will still be ok as long as you give them a big morn­ing wa­ter be­fore you leave. Give them a monthly feed of gen­eral fer­tiliser to en­cour­age longer flow­er­ing.

Be­cause the flow­ers are so hardy, your celosia will hold on to its blooms un­til they have dried on the plant. So, I rec­om­mend dead­head­ing them to en­cour­age new flow­ers to come through. And, if you look af­ter your celosias, their flam­ing blooms will re­ward you for a good cou­ple of months.

For more in­for­ma­tion go to awa­puni.co.nz

Celosia has bright flow­ers that make at­trac­tive gar­den bor­ders and they also look great in flower ar­range­ments.

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