N Korea warns Ja­pan of ‘real’ bal­lis­tic mis­sile

Muscat Daily - - WORLD -

Seoul, South Korea - North Korea on Satur­day warned Ja­panese Prime Min­is­ter Shinzo Abe that he could soon see a ‘real bal­lis­tic mis­sile’ as the lat­ter crit­i­cised the North’s lat­est test.

The con­dem­na­tion comes two days after the iso­lated state tested what it called a ‘su­per­large multiple launch rocket sys­tem’, with South Korea re­port­ing that two pro­jec­tiles came down in the Sea of Ja­pan, also known as the East Sea.

In the wake of the launch, which was su­per­vised by North Korean leader Kim Jongun, Abe termed the fired weapons ‘bal­lis­tic mis­siles’ that vi­o­lated UN res­o­lu­tions.

Abe ‘fails to dis­tin­guish a mis­sile from multiple launch rocket sys­tem while see­ing the pho­toac­com­pa­nied re­port’, a For­eign Min­istry of­fi­cial said in a state­ment car­ried by state news agency KCNA. ‘Abe may see what a real bal­lis­tic mis­sile is in the not dis­tant fu­ture and under his nose...’, it added. It was best for the North to avoid deal­ing with Abe, the of­fi­cial went on.

The Satur­day’s crit­i­cism of the Ja­panese leader is the sec­ond of its kind by Py­ongyang this month. The North had warned Abe that he would never set foot in Py­ongyang after he con­demned the North’s weapons test days ear­lier.

Py­ongyang is under multiple sets of in­ter­na­tional sanc­tions over its nu­clear weapon and bal­lis­tic mis­sile pro­grammes, which it says it needs to de­fend against a pos­si­ble US in­va­sion.

Nu­clear ne­go­ti­a­tions be­tween the US and the North have been at a stand­still since the Hanoi sum­mit be­tween Pres­i­dent Don­ald Trump and leader Kim Jongun broke up in Fe­bru­ary, and Py­ongyang has since de­manded the US change its ap­proach.

It is best for the North to avoid deal­ing with [Shinzo] Abe

For­eign Min­istry

(AFP)

This un­dated photo re­leased by North Korea on Fri­day shows the test-fire of a su­per-large multiple launch rocket sys­tem

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