Brown rice vs. white rice

THE GOV­ERN­MENT should pro­vide in­cen­tives to farm­ers who would plant low-amy­lose rice as a means to im­prove rice sup­ply in the coun­try. This is the be­lief of Al­fonso G. Puyat who has done per­sonal re­search on the ad­van­tages of pro­duc­ing low-amy­lose va­ri­eti

Agriculture - - Contents -

The low-amy­lose va­ri­eties are the va­ri­eties that have less than 18% amy­lose con­tent which are suit­able for milling into brown rice. When cooked, the low-amy­lose brown rice is soft and that is the eat­ing qual­ity highly pre­ferred by con­sumers. Of course, the low-amy­lose rice can also be milled into well-pol­ished white rice but there is a big ad­van­tage of the brown rice over the well-milled white rice.

Puyat com­pared the grain re­cov­ery when one kilo of palay is milled into brown rice and a kilo of the same va­ri­ety that is milled into white rice. The re­sult? One kilo of palay when milled into white rice pro­duced 630 grams. It had a milling re­cov­ery of 60-65%.

On the other hand, when one kilo of palay was milled into brown rice, the re­cov­ery was about 80% or 800 grams. The ad­di­tional milling re­cov­ery over white rice was about 25%.

Puyat also re­ported a very big ad­van­tage of the brown rice over the well-milled white rice when cooked. The well-pol­ished rice when cooked, pro­duced 1,596 grams. About 1,280 grams of wa­ter was used in cook­ing the white rice which is the typ­i­cal amount of wa­ter used in cook­ing white rice.

More wa­ter was used in cook­ing brown rice from one kilo of palay. A to­tal of 2,990 grams of wa­ter was used for cook­ing. And the fi­nal weight of the cooked brown rice was 2,723 grams. There’s a 1,127 grams ad­van­tage in the weight of cooked brown rice over the well-milled rice from one kilo of palay.

Here are four va­ri­eties of low-amy­lose rice that Puyat cited in his re­port. The data were pro­vided by IRRI and PhilRice.

RC 160 (a.k.a.Tu­bi­gan) has a milling re­cov­ery of 39-47.9% when milled into white rice. When milled into brown rice, re­cov­ery is 75-79.9%

RC 218 (Ma­bango 3) when milled into white rice, re­cov­ery is 48-56.9%. Brown rice, 75-79.9%.

RC 480 (GSR 8) when milled into white rice, 48-56.9%. Brown rice, 75-79.9%.

RC 534 (GSR 12) white rice, 57+%. Brown rice, 75-79.9%.

Now you see, there is a big ad­van­tage of brown rice over wellmilled rice. And that is not even count­ing the health ben­e­fits from brown rice. ON HIGH HIGH-AMY­LOSE VA­RI­ETIES - Puyat em­pha­sizes that va­ri­eties with more than 18% amy­lose con­tent are not suit­able for brown rice milling. The re­sult­ing brown rice when cooked, will be too hard and not nice to eat. On the other hand, low-amy­lose brown rice is tasty and fluffy when cooked.

When cooked, the well-milled white rice weighed 1,596 grams com­pared to 2,723 grams of cooked brown rice de­rived from a kilo of palay.

One kilo of palay had a re­cov­ery of 630 grams when milled into white rice. When milled into brown rice, it had a re­cov­ery of 800 grams, higher by 170 grams.

Cooked brown rice milled from a kilo of palay. The weight of the cooked brown rice is 2,723 grams com­pared to the 1,596 grams of white-milled rice. The cooked brown rice is heav­ier by 1,127 grams.

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