SEC­OND SKIN

WHO’S YOUR VIL­LAIN FOR THE SEA­SON?

Sun.Star Cebu Weekend - - Front Page - Pa­tri­cia May P. Catan SunS­tar Week­end Writer

Mak­ing cos­tumes and play­ing dress up has al­ways been a well-loved tra­di­tion dur­ing Hal­loween sea­son. It’s en­joyed by both chil­dren and adults alike. Not only is this art form pop­u­lar dur­ing the spook­i­est time of the year, but cos­tume mak­ing is some­thing that peo­ple like avid cos­play­ers en­joy do­ing for most days of the year. Cos­play­ers are no strangers to play­ing dress up, which make them the right peo­ple to run to for Hal­loween cos­tume ideas. If you have zero knowl­edge what’s best to wear and where to look for cos­tumes on Hal­loween night, six of Cebu’s prom­i­nent cos­play­ers share some tips on the art of cos­tume mak­ing that might fuel your cre­ativ­ity.

Joe­bert Jude Ci­mafranca, 33 Free­lance Graphic De­signer Who are you cos­play­ing and why?

This is Reaper from Over­watch. His de­sign looks pow­er­ful, dark and bad-ass. On the sur­face, he is a vil­lain that only knows vengeance, but peel it away you see he is a suf­fer­ing soul yet me­thod­i­cal and ef­fi­cient. I like char­ac­ters that have lay­ers be­hind their vis­ual ap­peal. It makes one ap­pre­ci­ate them more and gives me that crazy push to make a full cos­tume out of him.

What got you into cos­play­ing?

The peo­ple you meet, the chal­lenge it brings and the won­der it cre­ates. Cos­play­ing is a great medium to show one’s cre­ativ­ity in events or pho­tog­ra­phy.

Where do you get your in­spi­ra­tion from?

I get my in­spi­ra­tion from the char­ac­ters I ad­mire, other cos­play­ers abroad and my friends. Many have shown great ta­lent (here and abroad) in the craft and this is what gets me in­spired.

Where do you buy ma­te­ri­als for your cos­tume?

Ninety per­cent of the time in Colon. I dare say it is Cebu's Divi­so­ria. From fab­rics, foam, leather, school sup­plies to elec­tron­ics, there is not an end to what sur­prises you might find around its busy streets.

Where do you get your cos­tumes made?

I make them my­self.

Roughly how much do you spend for a cos­tume?

A full week's worth min­i­mum to a month or two for very elab­o­rate cos­tumes.

What’s an easy DIY cos­tume to make last minute?

You can trans­form your­self into a mafia lord with coats and vest found in most thrift shops. Add a fe­dora for ex­tra flair. There are also char­ac­ters with sim­ple out­fits like Luffy from One Piece, Pokemon char­ac­ters and Fin from Ad­ven­ture Time. There are many great ex­am­ples, you just need to look around.

Do you have some make up tricks?

If you plan to change your eye­brows, hide them first by us­ing glue stick be­fore ap­ply­ing foun­da­tion or con­cealer and then the eye­shadow.

To at­tach a fake beard, mus­tache or ba­si­cally any­thing to your face, use spirit gum. It is like make up glue.

You can also use trans­par­ent med­i­cal tapes as make up tapes. This is used to re­shape your chin or jaw­line by stretch­ing your cheeks.

Engr. Alan D. Vil­lar­ias, Jr., 29 Elec­tron­ics and Com­mu­ni­ca­tions En­gi­neer Props Maker Who are you cos­play­ing and why?

I'm cos­play­ing? Jami­son Fawkes a.k.a "Junkrat" from the game Over­watch. I cos­played him be­cause he's one of my fa­vorite char­ac­ters to use in the game and based on his ap­pear­ance and char­ac­ter­is­tics, we have some in com­mon.

What got you into cos­play­ing?

I got into cosplay through an un­ex­pected in­vite by a col­lege friend. They said they were form­ing a group dress­ing up as char­ac­ters from the anime One Piece (one of my fa­vorite ani­mes). I said, "Count me in” with­out sec­ond thought. Af­ter that first ex­pe­ri­ence, I was able to meet new friends who share a com­mon in­ter­est and hobby. The best part was that

I was able to ex­press my­self through the char­ac­ter I por­trayed. Also, I got hooked in props mak­ing. I prac­ticed and learned through the years up un­til to­day, which now be­came a fa­vorite hobby of mine.

Where do you get your in­spi­ra­tion from?

I get in­spi­ra­tion from my fel­low cos­play­ers. We tend to help each other by shar­ing and teach­ing each other tech­niques on how to make props, do make up and how to per­form on stage. See­ing how we are so into the hobby makes me want to im­prove and do bet­ter on each of my fol­low­ing cosplay.

Where do you buy ma­te­ri­als for your cos­tume?

I gen­er­ally buy ma­te­ri­als for my cos­tumes in down­town Cebu, Free­dom Park and Colon. It's a trea­sure trove for props maker like me. There are a lot of po­ten­tial ma­te­ri­als for props found in these ar­eas. I also buy some stuff on­line like wigs, con­tact lens, and other ma­te­ri­als not avail­able in store here in Cebu.

Where do you get your cos­tumes made?

It de­pends on the type of cos­tume.

If cloth re­lated, I some­times have it com­mis­sioned or sew it my­self or scav­enge the "ukay-ukay" shops in down­town and mod­ify it. For props and ac­ces­sories of the cos­tume, I usu­ally make them my­self or buy them on­line

Roughly how much do you spend for a cos­tume?

I roughly spend around P500 to P3,000 de­pend­ing on the type of cos­tume. But if you have a cre­ative and in­no­va­tive mind, you can bud­get your cos­tume us­ing al­ter­na­tive ma­te­ri­als and tech­niques.

What’s an easy DIY cos­tume to make last minute?

There is this what we call a Closet Cosplay. It's us­ing clothes found in your closet. You add a lit­tle some­thing like a wig, good make up, an iconic ac­ces­sory or item that will make it look like the char­ac­ter you want to por­tray but in ca­sual at­tire. For ex­am­ple, you can wear baggy clothes then get round glasses and draw a light­ning scar on your fore­head.

Do you have some make up tricks?

First, you must learn ba­sic make-up then try prac­tic­ing con­tour­ing. It's one of the make up tricks that will make you look like the char­ac­ter you want to be.

Mai Sasakura, 29 Con­tent Cre­ator Who are you cos­play­ing and why?

I'm cos­play­ing Orochi­maru from the anime series Naruto. There's no one an­swer to the rea­son I cosplay him but bear with me. When I cosplay, I nat­u­rally grav­i­tate to­wards char­ac­ters that aren't the main or hero ones so I usu­ally fa­vor the side char­ac­ters or the vil­lains and Orochi­maru was one of them. I loved this series so much grow­ing up and in fact, I have cos­played three other char­ac­ters from it. An­other rea­son is that I am into makeup as a hobby and some­times a side gig, so I wanted to chal­lenge my­self by try­ing to copy Orochi­maru's whole look by us­ing body paint and it re­ally made me happy when I learned how to do it and achieved what I wanted to go for.

What got you into cos­play­ing?

It started as a nat­u­ral pro­gres­sion from my love of Hal­loween and cos­tumes as a child. I al­ways saw these Amer­i­can shows and movies on tele­vi­sion grow­ing up and I was con­fused why kids dressed up in cos­tumes dur­ing cer­tain hol­i­days. That's how I knew of Hal­loween and trick-or-treat­ing. I didn't know about cosplay un­til the early 2000's and I was hooked when I knew that you can dress up in any­thing no mat­ter what time of the year.

Where do you get your in­spi­ra­tion from?

It's mostly from shows that I grew up watch­ing and series that I re­ally love. I only cosplay char­ac­ters that mean a lot to me, so I guess that's why I still get in­spired even af­ter al­most 10 years do­ing it.

Where do you buy ma­te­ri­als for your cos­tume?

I buy from any­where, re­ally, de­pend­ing on what I need. I scour fab­ric shops, ac­ces­sories stores, and even go on­line.

Where do you get your cos­tumes made?

I mostly make my cos­tumes, but when the de­sign is too com­pli­cated or when I'm pressed for time be­cause of work obli­ga­tions, I have it com­mis­sioned or made from dress­mak­ers I trust.

Roughly how much do you spend for a cos­tume?

For me, there are dif­fer­ent lev­els of dif­fi­culty when it comes to a cosplay cos­tume and your spend­ing can de­pend on how much you want it to be as ac­cu­rate to the char­ac­ter as pos­si­ble. If you know how to sew parts of your cos­tume or craft de­tails, you'd be able to save money but you'll need to spend ef­fort and time to make up for it.

What’s an easy DIY cos­tume to make last minute?

There's ac­tu­ally a lot to choose from and some of the pieces may al­ready be in your closet. Cosplay is not ex­clu­sive to anime and car­toons so you can dress up as char­ac­ters from live-ac­tion films, video games, manga, TV series, and comic books as well. A few great ex­am­ples would be Luffy from One Piece, L from Death Note, and No Face from Spir­ited Away. If an­i­mated shows are not your thing, there's Waldo from Where's Waldo, Chloe from Life is Strange, Lara Croft from Tomb Raider, and Tifa Lock­hart from Fi­nal Fan­tasy VII.

Do you have some makeup tricks?

The best way to get fa­mil­iar and be com­fort­able with makeup is to prac­tice. I started dab­bling in makeup in my late teens and I have never stopped learn­ing. Maybe it helps that I gen­uinely love it and con­sider it as an art form. In fact, I've delved into spe­cial ef­fects (SFX) makeup be­cause of it. My fond­ness for hor­ror and grisly movies and games had me cu­ri­ous enough to try to recre­ate spe­cific cos­metic ef­fects that in­volve blood and wounds. I ac­tu­ally have a Face­book page where I show­case all my works, but it's not for the faint of heart: Siren and Car­nage Makeup & SFX.

Izarzuri Vi­dal, 29 Govern­ment Em­ployee & Clas­si­cal Singer Who are you cos­play­ing and why?

The God­dess of Death Hela, the vil­lain of Marvel Stu­dio's Thor Rag­narok. Don't get me wrong but I have a big love for par­tic­u­lar vil­lains be­cause their re­spec­tive story is ex­cit­ing to know about and gives you the idea on what made them who they are. There are Vil­lains who thought about them­selves as he­roes and there are other vil­lains who do not in­tend to be an an­tag­o­nist in the first place. Hela is a com­plex char­ac­ter. She used to be an obe­di­ent daugh­ter of Odin yet was mis­un­der­stood for her am­bi­tion and con­quests all for As­gard. Odin's or­der for Hela's im­pris­on­ment for many years made a turn­ing point which then changed her and be­came the vil­lain in the movie.

What got you into cos­play­ing?

As an artist, you ap­pre­ci­ate a lot of things re­lated to the field. I hap­pen to be one of those peo­ple, which is why I got my­self di­rectly drawn to cos­play­ing. Other than that, I have a cousin of mine named Jazmyn Vil­lalva who en­cour­aged me to fi­nally try cosplay on Otaku Fest 2016. and since then, I have been par­tic­i­pat­ing in events and con­tests.

Where do you get your in­spi­ra­tion from?

Moral sup­port from fam­ily and friends. They are the rea­sons I con­tinue to pur­sue my love for this art.

Where do you buy ma­te­ri­als for your cos­tume?

I buy them at cer­tain tex­tile and home ma­te­rial stores. I also search for ma­te­ri­als at a thrift store like ukay-ukay. In my case, I al­ways com­bine new and re­cy­cled ma­te­ri­als for my cos­tumes be­cause it saves a lot of money and makes you re­source­ful in cre­at­ing your cos­tume.

Where do you get your cos­tumes made?

I have a fam­ily friend named Imelda Igot Di­lao, or Nang Emmy for short, whose skills in sew­ing cos­tumes are amaz­ing. She hap­pens to cre­ate all of my ba­sic suits and ba­sic dress cos­tumes. While for the de­tail­ing and gear, it's a com­bined ef­fort from me and my fam­ily.

Roughly how much do you spend for a cos­tume?

My es­ti­mate would be more or less seven thou­sand, es­pe­cially those grand type of cos­tumes. But if on a bud­get scale, it's less than two thou­sand.

What's an easy DIY cos­tume to make last minute?

I would prob­a­bly say a suit that is made of up­per ly­cra and leg­gings. One time, I made a Ne­ga­sonic Teenage War­head cos­tume for two hours us­ing my old black ly­cras and an old yel­low shirt which I at­tach to make the de­tails of the cos­tume. Re­source­ful­ness comes handy on this part.

Do you have some make up tricks?

If you want to achieve a closer re­sem­blance, it is im­por­tant to study the char­ac­ter's face and look. For Hela, I have to ob­serve Cate Blanchett's fa­cial fea­tures and the grudge look eye­shadow. So, I fol­low the con­tour­ing make-up to adapt those fa­cial fea­tures and adapt the eye col­ors to recre­ate the whole look.

Kert-Jan Ta­bana, 26 Cor­po­rate Trainer Who are you cos­play­ing and why?

I'm cos­play­ing Yomi from Ghost Fighter who is one of the most un­der­rated vil­lains in the series. I like him in par­tic­u­lar be­cause he has al­ways been the most re­laxed char­ac­ter with the big­gest plan in ex­e­cu­tion. A lowkey ge­nius.

What got you into cos­play­ing?

What re­ally got me into cos­play­ing were my friends who were big anime fans back when I was in early col­lege. One of them saw this event poster where some­one was in a Zoro (One Piece) cos­tume and sug­gested: "Hey Kert, let's join and let's all do what they're do­ing!"

Where do you get your in­spi­ra­tion from?

I mainly get my in­spi­ra­tion from a lot of for­eign male cos­play­ers. One in par­tic­u­lar is Kaname. There are more, but it has al­ways been him since I got into this hobby.

Where do you buy ma­te­ri­als for your cos­tume?

I buy ma­jor­ity of my cos­tume's ma­te­ri­als from lo­cal stores here in the city. The wigs, I or­der them on­line. The props and ac­ces­sories, I make them my­self.

Where do you get your cos­tumes made?

I usu­ally have a seam­stress ready to help me out for the cos­tume parts that are made of fab­ric, and I just make the props and ac­ces­sories my­self.

Roughly how much do you spend for a cos­tume?

I spend roughly P3,000 plus, de­pend­ing on the cos­tume's com­plex­ity.

What's an easy DIY cos­tume to make last minute?

Zom­bie cos­tumes! You just make some fake blood, get dirty clothes, and prob­a­bly buy some con­tact lenses that white out your pupil if you still have the bud­get.

Do you have some make up tricks?

I just know very lit­tle pros­thetic make-up tech­niques. I haven't fully in­cor­po­rated them to my cos­plays.

Joshua An­dro An­drino, 32 Ju­nior High School Art Teacher Who are cos­play­ing and why?

I'm cos­play­ing The Joker. Although this isn’t the first time I'm cos­play­ing this char­ac­ter, this ver­sion is an amal­ga­ma­tion of dif­fer­ent in­ter­pre­ta­tions of the char­ac­ter from graphic nov­els (Killing Joke), games (Arkham Asy­lum) and from a TV Series (Bat­man: The An­i­mated Series). Why cosplay him? He's an in­ter­est­ing char­ac­ter. He is un­pre­dictable, happy with chaos and he proves his points through "jokes" that only he can un­der­stand. He is the per­fect vil­lain to some­one like Bat­man who is grim and se­ri­ous, a po­lar op­po­site. Bat­man is for jus­tice while Joker is for dis­cord.

What got you into cos­play­ing?

What got me into cos­play­ing is be­ing just a hard­core fan I guess. The first time I cos­played was way back 2009. A friend told me about an event (ARCHCon), so I de­cided to join. I've been cos­play­ing ever since. I've joined com­pe­ti­tions here and in Manila. But I've been an anime/comic/movie en­thu­si­ast ever since I was a kid.

Where do you get your in­spi­ra­tion from?

I'm nor­mally in­spired by things I am a fan of like comic books and movies. I'm drawn to char­ac­ters who are quirky and have vis­ual ap­peal like vil­lains. Not just any bad guy type but vil­lains with com­pelling char­ac­ter­i­za­tion, swag­ger and con­fi­dence in­spire me to cosplay. Fam­ily is also a great source of in­spi­ra­tion and they would con­tinue to sup­port by at­tend­ing the cons I'm in and my stu­dents as well who would watch the events I'm in or cosplay with me.

Where do you buy ma­te­ri­als for your cos­tume?

Some­times I make the bits and pieces of my cos­tumes us­ing what­ever that is I can find. As for my Joker make up, I bought some of the ma­te­ri­als in the mall or any­where that sells make up and lenses. I or­der the wigs on­line. Ukay-ukay spots are ac­tu­ally great places to find clothes for the char­ac­ter, and helps to save money.

Where do you get your cos­tumes made?

There are times I would per­son­ally make the small parts of my cos­tumes, but for the larger por­tions like weapons or ar­mor, I would ask help from my friends who are props mak­ers.

Roughly how much do you spend for a cos­tume?

Around P3,000 to P6,000. I try my best to keep it within that amount and avoid buy­ing ma­te­ri­als in bulk.

What’s an easy DIY cos­tume to make last minute?

An easy DIY for me would be ar­mor plat­ings and small weapons like prop dag­gers.

Do you have some make up tricks?

For my Joker look, I en­hanced the "scary" as­pect by wear­ing yel­low con­tact lenses. It also helps to smear cer­tain parts of the make up, like on the lips to have that blood-like ef­fect.

Joe­bert Ci­mafranca as "Reaper" from Over­watch

Engr. Alan Vil­lar­ias as "Junkrat" from Over­watch

Mai Sasakura as "Orochi­maru" from Naruto

Orochi­maru & Hela Pho­tos: Jur­dan Ho

Izarzuri Vi­dal as "Hela" from Thor Rag­narok

Photo: Oni­giri Wasabi

Kert Ta­bana as "Yomi" from Ghost Fighter

Photo: Sam Gabuya

Josh An­drino as "The Joker"

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