Striv­ing for the fu­ture

Sun.Star Davao - - FRONT PAGE - BY GILFORD A. DOQUILA / Re­porter

To live a life stricken with tight fi­nan­cial needs is like trekking a nar­row path­way, but it is never a dead-end for a hard­work­ing stu­dent like Ja­son Codera who dreams of a bet­ter fu­ture.

For him, his life is some­thing not to be dic­tated by fate alone.

“Para sa akoa man gud im­por­tante nga makahu­man ko sa pagskwela kay kini makata­bang jud og dako pag-abot sa pana­hon (For me to fin­ish my ed­u­ca­tion is very im­por­tant be­cause this will ben­e­fit me when the time comes),” Codera said. He knows that the in­come his fa­ther earns from driv­ing the mo­to­rycyle ev­ery­day would not suf­fice Ja­son’s and his five other sib-

He knows that the in­come his fa­ther earns from driv­ing the mo­to­rycyle ev­ery­day would not suf­fice Ja­son’s and his five other sib­lings’ needs.

“Mao tung ako na pud ang naay ini­tia­tive nga man­gita og way para makata­bang pud sa akoang pagskwela. Nag­sugod ko og bali­gya og candies atung ju­nior high school hang­tud karun gapa­ma­li­gya gi­hapon ko (That’s why I made an ini­tia­tive to help my­self fin­ish my stud­ies. I started with sell­ing candies when I was in ju­nior high school, un­til now I still sell),” Codera said.

When he reached se­nior high school Ja­son de­cided to sell lumpia to earn more. It all started when Ja­son’s friend asked him if he wanted to sell lumpia, and when Ja­son agreed his life started to change.

He gets his sup­ply of lumpia from a lumpia maker in Aca­cia. The sup­ply gets to be de­liv­ered at his school’s gate where Ja­son waits and sells to his school­mates and teach­ers.

“500 pieces akong gin­a­bali­gya ug makaearn pud ko og P1,000 kada ad­law kung mahurot (I sell 500 pieces and earn P1,000 ev­ery­day if it gets sold out),” he said.

Ja­son knew that what he was earn­ing is a big help for him and his fam­ily that’s why he makes sure his earn­ings are well-saved.

“Gi­na­tigum nako for col­lege ta­pos katung akong gusto nga pal­i­tunon nga lap­top ma­palit pud nako maski sa pawn­shop para makatipid pud (I am sav­ing it for col­lege and for the things I want to buy like a lap­top even if it comes from the pawn­shop so that I can spend less),” Codera said.

He added with the in­come he gets, he shares it too with his fam­ily to make ends meet. He also helps his brother by pro­vid­ing him al­lowance from the in­come he earns from lumpia-sell­ing.

“Basta ka­balo lang ka mu­gasto sa kung un­say da­pat, dili lang na siya ipang­barkada (As long as you know how to spend it wisely, and not just for hang­ing out with friends),” Codera said.

Ja­son’s teacher Kris­tine M. Reyes is also a wit­ness to the gen­er­ous heart of Ja­son.

“When Ja­son has some­thing to give, he never fails to lend a help­ing a hand, es­pe­cially to his fam­ily and even to his friends,” Reyes said, adding that she is proud of Ja­son who is also a deli­gent stu­dent, com­ply­ing with aca­demic re­spon­si­bil­i­ties by par­tic­i­pat­ing in class and even lead­ing class­room works.

“Ang main­gon lang nako sa mga ka­bataan kay magsi­pag lang jud ug trust lang na walay im­posi­ble. Ug kung gana­han jud ka sa imong ginabuhat, makaya na tanan. Da­pat pud naa kay paghad­lok sa Gi­noo pud (What I can say to my fel­low youth is to be hard­work­ing and trust that noth­ing is im­pos­si­ble. If you re­ally love what you are do­ing, then there’s noth­ing you can’t do. Of course, you must be God-fear­ing),” Codera said in an in­ter­view.

“If you re­ally love what you are do­ing, then there’s noth­ing you can’t do. Of course, you must be God-fear­ing.”

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Philippines

© PressReader. All rights reserved.