PROS­TI­TU­TION: THINK TWICE

Sun.Star Davao - - Y-SPEAK! - BY ROGIE LLEGO / Con­trib­u­tor “The prob­lem with the so­ci­ety to­day is that they tend to fo­cus on the ob­vi­ous and not what is in­side.” ROGIE LLEGO

Pros­ti­tu­tion has been around for cen­turies. It is con­sid­ered to be the old­est busi­ness in the world. The le­gal­ity of it varies from coun­try to coun­try.

In the Philip­pine con­text, this busi­ness is il­le­gal. How­ever, the gov­ern­ment finds it hard to cap­ture them th­ese days be­cause some trans­ac­tions are through on­line and even through home ser­vice.

Cur­rently, the pop­u­la­tion of pros­ti­tuted women has reached to al­most 900,000 and still ex­pected to rise ev­ery year. Th­ese pros­ti­tuted women are as young as 11 to as old as 40 years old.

Pros­ti­tu­tion is just one of the branches of the sex in­dus­try which in­cludes pornog­ra­phy, nude modelling, strip­ping, and erotic danc­ing. But the ques­tion is, what re­ally pushed th­ese peo­ple to en­gage in this kind of busi­ness.

Last year, dur­ing the mak­ing of our doc­u­men­tary about pros­ti­tu­tion, we in­ter­viewed a pros­ti­tuted woman who has worked as a pros­ti­tute since she was 14. She cur­rently has five chil­dren.

Most of the pros­ti­tutes would say that poverty is the ma­jor rea­son why they are do­ing this.

How­ever, some of the pros­ti­tuted women just do this to buy drugs and to fund their vices.

But, for our in­ter­vie­wee (name with­held), she said she is do­ing this just for her chil­dren to sur­vive.

The re­li­gious so­ci­ety sees them as a dirty peo­ple be­cause of their deeds of sell­ing their selves. But, deep in­side it is ob­vi­ous that they are strug­gling just for their fam­ily to sur­vive.

Our in­ter­vie­wee also said she wants to stop in this kind of work but this field is the only way that she thinks can sus­tain the needs of her chil­dren. She is also strug­gling to tell her­self to stop do­ing this but, she just can’t be­cause of the big in­come per cus­tomer.

The prob­lem with the so­ci­ety to­day is that they tend to fo­cus on the ob­vi­ous and not what is in­side. They judge quickly but if they will just know the sto­ries of those peo­ple, they might think twice.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Philippines

© PressReader. All rights reserved.